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Insecticidal Properties of Capsaicinoids and Glucosinolates Extracted from Capsicum chinense and Tropaeolum tuberosum

1
Faculty of Forest and Environmet Science, National University of Central Peru, Huancayo 12000, Peru
2
National Institute of Agricultural Innovation—Experimental Station of Santa, Huancayo 12000, Peru
3
School of Biology, National University of San Antonio Abad in Cusco, Cusco 08001, Peru
4
Department of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146, USA
5
High Mountain Research Center National University of Central Peru, Huancayo 1200, Peru
6
Faculty of Food Industry Engineering, National University of Central Peru, Huancayo 12000, Peru
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(5), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10050132
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 13 April 2019 / Accepted: 23 April 2019 / Published: 6 May 2019
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Abstract

Food security and biodiversity conservation are threatened by the emergence and spread of pest and pathogens, and thus there is a current need to develop pest management strategies that are sustainable and friendly to the environment and human health. Here, we performed laboratory and field bioassays to evaluate the insecticidal effects of several concentrations of capsaicinoids and glucosinolates (separately and mixed) on an aphid pest (Aphis cytisorum). The capsaicinoids were extracted from the fruits of Capsicum chinense and glucosinolates from the tubers of native Andean crop Tropaeolum tuberosum. We found that both capsaicinoids and glucosinolates have a biocidal effect on A. cytisorum, acting within a fairly short time. Under laboratory conditions, the toxicity of the compounds increased in relation to their concentrations, causing a high percentage of mortality (83–99%) when the aphids were exposed to dilutions of 10% capsaicinoids, 75–100% glucosinolates, or a mixture of 10% capsaicinoids and 90% glucosinolates. The mortality of aphids sprayed in the field with 5% capsaicinoids, 50% glucosinolates, or with a mixture of 5% capsaicinoids and 45% glucosinolates reached 87–97%. Results obtained from laboratory and field experiments were consistent. Our results suggest the potential use of bioinsecticides based on capsaicinoids and/or glucosinolates as an effective alternative to synthetic pesticides. View Full-Text
Keywords: aphid pests; bioinsecticide; climate change; eco-friendly products; natural insecticides; natural products; pest control aphid pests; bioinsecticide; climate change; eco-friendly products; natural insecticides; natural products; pest control
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Claros Cuadrado, J.L.; Pinillos, E.O.; Tito, R.; Mirones, C.S.; Gamarra Mendoza, N.N. Insecticidal Properties of Capsaicinoids and Glucosinolates Extracted from Capsicum chinense and Tropaeolum tuberosum. Insects 2019, 10, 132.

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