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Towards Precision Nutrition: A Novel Concept Linking Phytochemicals, Immune Response and Honey Bee Health

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Centro de Investigación en Abejas Sociales (CIAS), Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata (UNMdP), Deán Funes 3350, Mar del Plata CP 7600, Argentina
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Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Godoy Cruz 2290, Buenos Aires C1425FQB, Argentina
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Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences, College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources, University of Hawaii at Manoa, 3050 Maile Way, 310 Gilmore Hall, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA
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Instituto de Investigaciones Biológicas (IIB-CONICET), UNMdP, Dean Funes 3350, Mar del Plata CP 7600, Argentina
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Insects 2019, 10(11), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10110401
Received: 30 July 2019 / Revised: 2 November 2019 / Accepted: 5 November 2019 / Published: 12 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology of Social Insect Diseases)
The high annual losses of managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) has attracted intensive attention, and scientists have dedicated much effort trying to identify the stresses affecting bees. There are, however, no simple answers; rather, research suggests multifactorial effects. Several works have been reported highlighting the relationship between bees’ immunosuppression and the effects of malnutrition, parasites, pathogens, agrochemical and beekeeping pesticides exposure, forage dearth and cold stress. Here we analyze a possible connection between immunity-related signaling pathways that could be involved in the response to the stress resulted from Varroa-virus association and cold stress during winter. The analysis was made understanding the honey bee as a superorganism, where individuals are integrated and interacting within the colony, going from social to individual immune responses. We propose the term “Precision Nutrition” as a way to think and study bees’ nutrition in the search for key molecules which would be able to strengthen colonies’ responses to any or all of those stresses combined. View Full-Text
Keywords: Apis mellifera; nutrition; immunity; Varroa; cold stress; signaling pathways Apis mellifera; nutrition; immunity; Varroa; cold stress; signaling pathways
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Negri, P.; Villalobos, E.; Szawarski, N.; Damiani, N.; Gende, L.; Garrido, M.; Maggi, M.; Quintana, S.; Lamattina, L.; Eguaras, M. Towards Precision Nutrition: A Novel Concept Linking Phytochemicals, Immune Response and Honey Bee Health. Insects 2019, 10, 401.

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