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Expressions of HLA Class II Genes in Cutaneous Melanoma Were Associated with Clinical Outcome: Bioinformatics Approaches and Systematic Analysis of Public Microarray and RNA-Seq Datasets

1
Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
2
Department of Dermatology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
3
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
4
Department of Beauty Science, National Taichung University of Science and Technology, Taichung 403, Taiwan
5
Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung 807, Taiwan
6
Institute of Medical Science and Technology, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Diagnostics 2019, 9(2), 59; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics9020059
Received: 21 May 2019 / Revised: 6 June 2019 / Accepted: 10 June 2019 / Published: 12 June 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics)
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PDF [5218 KB, uploaded 13 June 2019]
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Abstract

Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, encoded by human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II genes, play important roles in antigen presentation and initiation of immune responses. However, the correlation between HLA class II gene expression level and patient survival and disease progression in cutaneous melanoma is still under investigation. In the present study, we analyzed microarray and RNA-Seq data of cutaneous melanoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) using different bioinformatics tools. Survival analysis revealed higher expression level of HLA class II genes in cutaneous melanoma, especially HLA-DP and -DR, was significantly associated with better overall survival. Furthermore, the expressions of HLA class II genes were most closely associated with survival in cutaneous melanoma as compared with other cancer types. The expression of HLA class II co-expressed genes, which were found to associate with antigen processing, immune response, and inflammatory response, was also positively associated with overall survival in cutaneous melanoma. Therefore, the results indicated that increased HLA class II expression may contribute to enhanced anti-tumor immunity and related inflammatory response via presenting tumor antigens to the immune system. The expression pattern of HLA class II genes may serve as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic targets in cutaneous melanoma. View Full-Text
Keywords: cutaneous melanoma; HLA class II; MHC class II; bioinformatics cutaneous melanoma; HLA class II; MHC class II; bioinformatics
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Chen, Y.-Y.; Chang, W.-A.; Lin, E.-S.; Chen, Y.-J.; Kuo, P.-L. Expressions of HLA Class II Genes in Cutaneous Melanoma Were Associated with Clinical Outcome: Bioinformatics Approaches and Systematic Analysis of Public Microarray and RNA-Seq Datasets. Diagnostics 2019, 9, 59.

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