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Article

The Use of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement to Filter Stormwater for Non-Potable Uses in Buildings

Laboratory of Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Santa Catarina, Florianópolis-SC 88040-900, Brazil
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Water 2020, 12(7), 2045; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072045
Received: 25 May 2020 / Revised: 14 July 2020 / Accepted: 16 July 2020 / Published: 18 July 2020
A reduction in potable water demand in buildings could be made by using non-potable water for certain uses, such as flushing toilets. This represents a sustainable strategy that results in potable water savings while also using an underutilised resource. This work assesses the use of permeable interlocking concrete pavement to filter stormwater that could be used for non-potable purposes in buildings. Two pavement model systems were tested. One of the model systems presents a filter course layer with coarse sand and the other model system has no filter course layer. In order to evaluate the filtering capacity, the model systems were exposed to rain events. The amount of water infiltrated through the layers was measured to represent the potential quantity available for use. Stormwater runoff samples were collected from a parking lot paved with impermeable interlocked blocks and then, these were tested in both model systems. Water samples were subjected to quality tests according to the parameters recommended by the Brazilian National Water Agency. The model system with no filter course showed filtering capacity higher (88.1%) than the one with a filter course layer (78.8%). The model system with a filter course layer was able to reduce fecal coliforms (54.7%), total suspended solids (62.5%), biochemical oxygen demand (78.8%), and total phosphorus concentrations (55.6%). Biochemical oxygen demand (42.4%) and total phosphorus concentrations (44.4%) increased in the model system with no filter course layer. In conclusion, one can state that the filter course layer used in permeable interlocking concrete pavement can contribute to decreasing pollutants and can improve stormwater quality. The use of permeable interlocking concrete pavement showed to be a potential alternative for filtering stormwater prior to subsequent treatment for non-potable uses in buildings. View Full-Text
Keywords: permeable interlocking concrete pavement; stormwater; non-potable uses; buildings permeable interlocking concrete pavement; stormwater; non-potable uses; buildings
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MDPI and ACS Style

Ghisi, E.; Belotto, T.; Thives, L.P. The Use of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement to Filter Stormwater for Non-Potable Uses in Buildings. Water 2020, 12, 2045. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072045

AMA Style

Ghisi E, Belotto T, Thives LP. The Use of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement to Filter Stormwater for Non-Potable Uses in Buildings. Water. 2020; 12(7):2045. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072045

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ghisi, Enedir, Thiago Belotto, and Liseane P. Thives 2020. "The Use of Permeable Interlocking Concrete Pavement to Filter Stormwater for Non-Potable Uses in Buildings" Water 12, no. 7: 2045. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12072045

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