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Article

Crossroads of Continents and Modern Boundaries: An Introduction to Inuit and Chukchi Experiences in the Bering Strait, Beaufort Sea, and Baffin Bay

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Ocean Conservancy, Eagle River, AK 99577, USA
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Inuvik, NT X0E 0T0, Canada
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Iqaluit, NU X0A 0H0, Canada
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Greenland Institute of Natural Resources, Nuuk 3900, Greenland
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Eskimo Walrus Commission, Nome, AK 99762, USA
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Qaanaaq 3971, Greenland
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North Slope Borough Department of Wildlife Management, Kaktovik, AK 99747, USA
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Department of Anthropology, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, AK 99775, USA
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(6), 1808; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061808
Received: 21 May 2020 / Revised: 11 June 2020 / Accepted: 20 June 2020 / Published: 24 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Transboundary Water Governance: New Sights and Developments)
The homeland of Inuit extends from Asia and the Bering Sea to Greenland and the Atlantic Ocean. Inuit and their Chukchi neighbors have always been highly mobile, but the imposition of three international borders in the region constrained travel, trade, hunting, and resource stewardship among neighboring groups. Colonization, assimilation, and enforcement of national laws further separated those even from the same family. In recent decades, Inuit and Chukchi have re-established many ties across those boundaries, making it easier to travel and trade with one another and to create new institutions of environmental management. To introduce Indigenous perspectives into the discussion of transboundary maritime water connections in the Arctic, this paper presents personal descriptions of what those connections mean to people who live and work along and across each of the national frontiers within the region: Russia–U.S., U.S.–Canada, and Canada–Greenland. Some of these connections have been made in cooperation with national governments, some in the absence of government activity, and some despite opposition from national governments. In all cases, the shared culture of the region has provided a common foundation for a shared vision and commitment to cooperation and the resumption of Indigenous self-determination within their homelands. View Full-Text
Keywords: Inuit; Chukchi; Arctic; maritime waters; sovereignty; mobility; wildlife Inuit; Chukchi; Arctic; maritime waters; sovereignty; mobility; wildlife
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MDPI and ACS Style

Huntington, H.P.; Binder Sr., R.; Comeau, R.; Holm, L.K.; Metcalf, V.; Oshima, T.; SimsKayotuk, C.; Zdor, E. Crossroads of Continents and Modern Boundaries: An Introduction to Inuit and Chukchi Experiences in the Bering Strait, Beaufort Sea, and Baffin Bay. Water 2020, 12, 1808. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061808

AMA Style

Huntington HP, Binder Sr. R, Comeau R, Holm LK, Metcalf V, Oshima T, SimsKayotuk C, Zdor E. Crossroads of Continents and Modern Boundaries: An Introduction to Inuit and Chukchi Experiences in the Bering Strait, Beaufort Sea, and Baffin Bay. Water. 2020; 12(6):1808. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061808

Chicago/Turabian Style

Huntington, Henry P., Richard Binder Sr., Robert Comeau, Lene K. Holm, Vera Metcalf, Toku Oshima, Carla SimsKayotuk, and Eduard Zdor. 2020. "Crossroads of Continents and Modern Boundaries: An Introduction to Inuit and Chukchi Experiences in the Bering Strait, Beaufort Sea, and Baffin Bay" Water 12, no. 6: 1808. https://doi.org/10.3390/w12061808

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