Next Article in Journal
Machine Learning Approaches for Predicting Health Risk of Cyanobacterial Blooms in Northern European Lakes
Previous Article in Journal
Recent Trends in Freshwater Influx to the Arctic Ocean from Four Major Arctic-Draining Rivers
Previous Article in Special Issue
Incorporating Rainwater Harvesting Systems in Iran’s Potable Water-Saving Scheme by Using a GIS-Simulation Based Decision Support System
Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle

A Critical Evaluation of the Water Supply and Stormwater Management Performance of Retrofittable Domestic Rainwater Harvesting Systems

1
Department of Civil and Structural Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD, UK
2
Centre for Water Systems, College of Engineering, Mathematics and Physical Sciences, University of Exeter, Exeter EX4 4QF, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2020, 12(4), 1184; https://doi.org/10.3390/w12041184
Received: 20 March 2020 / Revised: 16 April 2020 / Accepted: 17 April 2020 / Published: 21 April 2020
Rainwater harvesting systems are often used as both an alternative water source and a stormwater management tool. Many studies have focused on the water-saving potential of these systems, but research into aspects that impact stormwater retention—such as demand patterns and climate change—is lacking. This paper investigates the short-term impact of demand on both water supply and stormwater management and examines future and potential performance over a longer time scale using climate change projections. To achieve this, data was collected from domestic rainwater harvesting systems in Broadhempston, UK, and used to create a yield-after-spillage model. The validation process showed that using constant demand as opposed to monitored data had little impact on accuracy. With regards to stormwater management, it was found that monitored households did not use all the non-potable available water, and that increasing their demand for this was the most effective way of increasing retention capacity based on the modelling study completed. Installing passive or active runoff control did not markedly improve performance. Passive systems reduced the outflow to greenfield runoff for the longest time, whereas active systems increased the outflow to a level substantially above roof runoff in the 30 largest events. View Full-Text
Keywords: domestic rainwater harvesting; stormwater management; water supply domestic rainwater harvesting; stormwater management; water supply
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Quinn, R.; Melville-Shreeve, P.; Butler, D.; Stovin, V. A Critical Evaluation of the Water Supply and Stormwater Management Performance of Retrofittable Domestic Rainwater Harvesting Systems. Water 2020, 12, 1184.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop