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Potential Health Risks Linked to Emerging Contaminants in Major Rivers and Treated Waters

1
Department of Biological Sciences, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, USA
2
Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, USA
3
Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Cell Differentiation and Development Center, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(12), 2615; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11122615
Received: 30 October 2019 / Revised: 3 December 2019 / Accepted: 4 December 2019 / Published: 11 December 2019
The presence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in our local waterways is becoming an increasing threat to the surrounding population. These compounds and their degradation products (found in pesticides, herbicides, and plastic waste) are known to interfere with a range of biological functions from reproduction to differentiation. To better understand these effects, we used an in silico ontological pathway analysis to identify the genes affected by the most commonly detected EDCs in large river water supplies, which we grouped together based on four common functions: Organismal injuries, cell death, cancer, and behavior. In addition to EDCs, we included the opioid buprenorphine in our study, as this similar ecological threat has become increasingly detected in river water supplies. Through the identification of the pleiotropic biological effects associated with both the acute and chronic exposure to EDCs and opioids in local water supplies, our results highlight a serious health threat worthy of additional investigations with a potential emphasis on the effects linked to increased DNA damage. View Full-Text
Keywords: endocrine disrupting chemical; opioid; pathway analysis; ontology; metabolomics endocrine disrupting chemical; opioid; pathway analysis; ontology; metabolomics
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Kessler, J.; Dawley, D.; Crow, D.; Garmany, R.; Georgel, P.T. Potential Health Risks Linked to Emerging Contaminants in Major Rivers and Treated Waters. Water 2019, 11, 2615.

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