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Article

Addressing Long-Term Operational Risk Management in Port Docks under Climate Change Scenarios—A Spanish Case Study

1
ETSI de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), HRL-UPM & CEHINAV-UPM, 28040 Madrid, Spain
2
Organismo Público de Puertos del Estado (OPPE), 28042 Madrid, Spain
3
ETSI de Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha (UCLM), 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain
4
Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht (HZG), 21502 Geesthacht, Germany
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Water 2019, 11(10), 2153; https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102153
Received: 13 September 2019 / Revised: 10 October 2019 / Accepted: 11 October 2019 / Published: 16 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Climate Change on Coastal Hydrodynamics)
Ports are strategic hubs of the logistic chain and are likely to be exposed to natural hazard events. Variation of metocean agents derived from climate change, such as sea level rise or changes in the magnitude, frequency, duration, and direction of storms, can modify the infrastructural and operational vulnerability of port areas and activities, demanding the development of adaptation or mitigation strategies. In this context, the present paper is aimed to propose a downscaling methodology for addressing local effects at port scale. In addition, based on previously identifying and defining the Areas of Operational Interest (AOIs) inside ports, an approach towards the evaluation of operational vulnerability is offered. The whole process is applied, as a practical case, to the Port of Gijón (Spain) for different General Circulation Models (GCMs), concentration scenarios, and time horizons. The results highlight, in line with other publications, that inter-model differences are, so far, more significant than intra-model differences from dissimilar time horizons or concentration scenarios. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; operational risk; operational downtime; vulnerability analysis; downscaling; Areas of Operational Interest; AOIs climate change; operational risk; operational downtime; vulnerability analysis; downscaling; Areas of Operational Interest; AOIs
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MDPI and ACS Style

Campos, Á.; García-Valdecasas, J.M.; Molina, R.; Castillo, C.; Álvarez-Fanjul, E.; Staneva, J. Addressing Long-Term Operational Risk Management in Port Docks under Climate Change Scenarios—A Spanish Case Study. Water 2019, 11, 2153. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102153

AMA Style

Campos Á, García-Valdecasas JM, Molina R, Castillo C, Álvarez-Fanjul E, Staneva J. Addressing Long-Term Operational Risk Management in Port Docks under Climate Change Scenarios—A Spanish Case Study. Water. 2019; 11(10):2153. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102153

Chicago/Turabian Style

Campos, Álvaro; García-Valdecasas, José M.; Molina, Rafael; Castillo, Carmen; Álvarez-Fanjul, Enrique; Staneva, Joanna. 2019. "Addressing Long-Term Operational Risk Management in Port Docks under Climate Change Scenarios—A Spanish Case Study" Water 11, no. 10: 2153. https://doi.org/10.3390/w11102153

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