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Aviation Meteorology at Several Plane Crash Sites

A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Pyzhevskii per. 3, Moscow 119017, Russia
Atmosphere 2019, 10(2), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020050
Received: 11 January 2019 / Revised: 24 January 2019 / Accepted: 25 January 2019 / Published: 28 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aviation Meteorology)
The causes of aircraft crashes were investigated for several accidents, such as the Tu-154 and the Airbus A320-211 crashes near Sochi, Russia; the Airbus A320-232 crash near the Perpignan airport; and the Airbus A310-324 crash during landing in Moroni, Comoros Islands. Failures related to aircraft aerodynamics caused these air catastrophes. Upon encountering an upward vertical front, the airstream over the plane wing was disrupted and, as a result, the aerodynamic lifting force suddenly and dramatically decreased. The critical value of the vertical wind speed in a sea-land front (SLF) was determined to be ~0.5–1.0 m s−1. Some recommendations are proposed to prevent such aircraft accidents near coastal airfields. Forecast predictions of a sea-land breeze w-Front and of MWT (Mountain Wave Turbulence) were performed by regional atmospheric models with a resolution no lower than 2 km. Further, a possible reason for the sudden disappearance of aircraft near the coast of Florida is suggested. View Full-Text
Keywords: aircraft accident; aviation meteorology; regional meteorological model; WRF-ARW; vertical front; sea-land breeze; mountain wave turbulence aircraft accident; aviation meteorology; regional meteorological model; WRF-ARW; vertical front; sea-land breeze; mountain wave turbulence
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MDPI and ACS Style

Safronov, A.N. Aviation Meteorology at Several Plane Crash Sites. Atmosphere 2019, 10, 50. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020050

AMA Style

Safronov AN. Aviation Meteorology at Several Plane Crash Sites. Atmosphere. 2019; 10(2):50. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020050

Chicago/Turabian Style

Safronov, Alexander N. 2019. "Aviation Meteorology at Several Plane Crash Sites" Atmosphere 10, no. 2: 50. https://doi.org/10.3390/atmos10020050

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