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Amyloid Proteins and Peripheral Neuropathy

1
Center for Translational Immunology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, 3584 EA Utrecht, The Netherlands
2
The National Centre for Genomic Technology, Life Science and Environment Research Institute, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology, P.O. Box 6086, 11461 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3
Center for Molecular Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht University, 3584 EA Utrecht, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Cells 2020, 9(6), 1553; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9061553
Received: 2 June 2020 / Revised: 20 June 2020 / Accepted: 22 June 2020 / Published: 26 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Insights into Molecular Mechanisms of Chronic Pain)
Painful peripheral neuropathy affects millions of people worldwide. Peripheral neuropathy develops in patients with various diseases, including rare familial or acquired amyloid polyneuropathies, as well as some common diseases, including type 2 diabetes mellitus and several chronic inflammatory diseases. Intriguingly, these diseases share a histopathological feature—deposits of amyloid-forming proteins in tissues. Amyloid-forming proteins may cause tissue dysregulation and damage, including damage to nerves, and may be a common cause of neuropathy in these, and potentially other, diseases. Here, we will discuss how amyloid proteins contribute to peripheral neuropathy by reviewing the current understanding of pathogenic mechanisms in known inherited and acquired (usually rare) amyloid neuropathies. In addition, we will discuss the potential role of amyloid proteins in peripheral neuropathy in some common diseases, which are not (yet) considered as amyloid neuropathies. We conclude that there are many similarities in the molecular and cell biological defects caused by aggregation of the various amyloid proteins in these different diseases and propose a common pathogenic pathway for “peripheral amyloid neuropathies”. View Full-Text
Keywords: amyloid proteins; amyloidosis; type 2 diabetes mellitus; peripheral neuropathy; amyloid neuropathies; chronic pain amyloid proteins; amyloidosis; type 2 diabetes mellitus; peripheral neuropathy; amyloid neuropathies; chronic pain
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MDPI and ACS Style

Asiri, M.M.H.; Engelsman, S.; Eijkelkamp, N.; Höppener, J.W.M. Amyloid Proteins and Peripheral Neuropathy. Cells 2020, 9, 1553. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9061553

AMA Style

Asiri MMH, Engelsman S, Eijkelkamp N, Höppener JWM. Amyloid Proteins and Peripheral Neuropathy. Cells. 2020; 9(6):1553. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9061553

Chicago/Turabian Style

Asiri, Mohammed M.H.; Engelsman, Sjoukje; Eijkelkamp, Niels; Höppener, Jo W.M. 2020. "Amyloid Proteins and Peripheral Neuropathy" Cells 9, no. 6: 1553. https://doi.org/10.3390/cells9061553

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