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Characteristics and Potentiality of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (hASCs) Obtained from Enzymatic Digestion of Fat Graft

1
Department of Surgical Science, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome 00133, Italy
2
Scientific and Technological Park fo Medicine “Mario Veronesi”, via 29 Maggio, 6, 41037 Mirandola, Italy
3
The Oncologic and Reconstructive Surgery Breast Unit, Oncology Department, Careggi University Hospital, Firenze 50134, Italy
4
San Rossore Breast Unit, Pisa 56122, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Cells 2019, 8(3), 282; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells8030282
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 8 March 2019 / Accepted: 19 March 2019 / Published: 25 March 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Stem Cells in Personalized Medicine)
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Abstract

Human adipose-derived stem cells localize in the stromal-vascular portion, and can be ex vivo isolated using a combination of washing steps and enzymatic digestion. For this study, we undertook a histological evaluation of traditional fat graft compared with fat graft enriched with stromal vascular fraction cells isolated by the Celution™ system to assess the interactions between cells and adipose tissue before the breast injection. In addition, we reported on histological analyses of biopsies derived from fat grafted (traditional or enriched with SVFs) in the breast in order to assess the quality of the adipose tissue, fibrosis and vessels. The hASCs derived from enzymatic digestion were systematically characterized for growth features, phenotype and multi-potent differentiation potential. They fulfill the definition of mesenchymal stem cells, albeit with a higher neural phenotype profile. These cells also express genes that constitute the core circuitry of self-renewal such as OCT4, SOX2, NANOG and neurogenic lineage genes such as NEUROD1, PAX6 and SOX3. Such findings support the hypothesis that hASCs may have a potential usefulness in neurodegenerative conditions. These data can be helpful for the development of new therapeutic approaches in personalized medicine to assess safety and efficacy of the breast reconstruction. View Full-Text
Keywords: ASCs; adipose-derived stem cells; SVFs; stromal vascular fraction cells; enzymatic digestion; personalized medicine; characteristics of adipose-derived stem cells ASCs; adipose-derived stem cells; SVFs; stromal vascular fraction cells; enzymatic digestion; personalized medicine; characteristics of adipose-derived stem cells
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Gentile, P.; Piccinno, M.S.; Calabrese, C. Characteristics and Potentiality of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells (hASCs) Obtained from Enzymatic Digestion of Fat Graft. Cells 2019, 8, 282.

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