Next Article in Journal
Low Doses of Mycotoxin Mixtures below EU Regulatory Limits Can Negatively Affect the Performance of Broiler Chickens: A Longitudinal Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Over 25 Years of Pediatric Botulinum Toxin Treatments: What Have We Learned from Injection Techniques, Doses, Dilutions, and Recovery of Repeated Injections?
Previous Article in Journal
Genomics of Maize Resistance to Fusarium Ear Rot and Fumonisin Contamination
Previous Article in Special Issue
Forty Years of the Description of Brown Spider Venom Phospholipases-D
Open AccessArticle

Potential of Bacteriocins from Lactobacillus taiwanensis for Producing Bacterial Ghosts as a Next Generation Vaccine

1
Gene Analysis Center, Gyeongnam National University of Science & Technology, Jinju 52725, Korea
2
Department of Pharmaceutical Engineering, Gyeongnam National University of Science and Technology, Jinju 52725, Korea
3
National Institute of Biological Resources (NIBR), Environmental Research Complex, Incheon 22689, Korea
4
Department of pharmacology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Korea
5
Department of physiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 34134, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Toxins 2020, 12(7), 432; https://doi.org/10.3390/toxins12070432
Received: 28 April 2020 / Revised: 18 June 2020 / Accepted: 28 June 2020 / Published: 1 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Drug Development Using Natural Toxins)
Bacteriocins are functionally diverse toxins produced by most microbes and are potent antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) for bacterial ghosts as next generation vaccines. Here, we first report that the AMPs secreted from Lactobacillus taiwanensis effectively form ghosts of pathogenic bacteria and are identified as diverse bacteriocins, including novel ones. In detail, a cell-free supernatant from L. taiwanensis exhibited antimicrobial activities against pathogenic bacteria and was observed to effectively cause cellular lysis through pore formation in the bacterial membrane using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The treatment of the cell-free supernatant with proteinase K or EDTA proved that the antimicrobial activity is mediated by AMPs, and the purification of AMPs using Sep-Pak columns indicated that the cell-free supernatant includes various amphipathic peptides responsible for the antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, the whole-genome sequencing of L. taiwanensis revealed that the strain has diverse bacteriocins, confirmed experimentally to function as AMPs, and among them are three novel bacteriocins, designated as Tan 1, Tan 2, and Tan 3. We also confirmed, using SEM, that Tan 2 effectively produces bacterial ghosts. Therefore, our data suggest that the bacteriocins from L. taiwanensis are potentially useful as a critical component for the preparation of bacterial ghosts. View Full-Text
Keywords: AMPs; antimicrobial activity; bacterial ghost; bacteriocin; Lactobacillus taiwanensis AMPs; antimicrobial activity; bacterial ghost; bacteriocin; Lactobacillus taiwanensis
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, S.W.; Ha, Y.J.; Bang, K.H.; Lee, S.; Yeo, J.-H.; Yang, H.-S.; Kim, T.-W.; Lee, K.P.; Bang, W.Y. Potential of Bacteriocins from Lactobacillus taiwanensis for Producing Bacterial Ghosts as a Next Generation Vaccine. Toxins 2020, 12, 432.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop