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The Infant Gut Microbiome: Evidence for Obesity Risk and Dietary Intervention

1
Department of Pediatrics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1C9, Canada
2
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, T6G 1C9, Canada
3
Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3E 0W3, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2015, 7(4), 2237-2260; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7042237
Received: 30 January 2015 / Revised: 4 March 2015 / Accepted: 18 March 2015 / Published: 31 March 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiome and Human Health)
Increasing globally, particularly in children, obesity is a serious public health issue and risk factor for overweight and metabolic disease in later life. Both in experimental animal and human studies, advances in gene sequencing technologies have yielded intriguing possibilities for the role of the gut microbiome in later development of overweight status. Before translating study findings into practice, we must first reconcile inconsistencies between animal experimentation, and human adult and infant studies. Recent evidence for associations with gut microbiota and infant weight gain or child weight status, implicate Bacteroides and Lactobacillus species. Dietary manipulation with human milk and pre/probiotic formulations holds promise for preventing obesity. View Full-Text
Keywords: infant; nutrition; microbiome; human milk; prebiotics; probiotics; atopy; overweight infant; nutrition; microbiome; human milk; prebiotics; probiotics; atopy; overweight
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Koleva, P.T.; Bridgman, S.L.; Kozyrskyj, A.L. The Infant Gut Microbiome: Evidence for Obesity Risk and Dietary Intervention. Nutrients 2015, 7, 2237-2260.

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