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Article

Effect of the Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition (LEAN) Study on Long-Term Weight Loss Maintenance in Women with Breast Cancer

1
Frank H. Netter MD School of Medicine, Quinnipiac University, Hamden, CT 06518, USA
2
Yale School of Public Health, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
3
Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
4
Yale School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06510, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Wendy Demark-Wahnefried and Christina Dieli-Conwright
Nutrients 2021, 13(9), 3265; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093265
Received: 25 August 2021 / Revised: 17 September 2021 / Accepted: 17 September 2021 / Published: 18 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effect of Diet and Physical Activity on Cancer Prevention and Control)
Lifestyle interventions among breast cancer survivors with obesity have demonstrated successful short-term weight loss, but data on long-term weight maintenance are limited. We evaluated long-term weight loss maintenance in 100 breast cancer survivors with overweight/obesity in the efficacious six-month Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition (LEAN) Study (intervention = 67; usual care = 33). Measured baseline and six-month weights were available for 92 women. Long-term weight data were obtained from electronic health records. We assessed weight trajectories between study completion (2012–2013) and July 2019 using growth curve analyses. Over up to eight years (mean = 5.9, SD = 1.9) of post-intervention follow-up, both the intervention (n = 60) and usual care (n = 32) groups declined in body weight. Controlling for body weight at study completion, the yearly weight loss rate in the intervention and usual care groups was –0.20 kg (−0.2%/year) (95% CI: 0.06, 0.33, p = 0.004) and −0.32 kg (−0.4%/year) (95% CI: 0.12, 0.53, p = 0.002), respectively; mean weight change did not differ between groups (p = 0.31). It was encouraging that both groups maintained their original intervention period weight loss (6% intervention, 2% usual care) and had modest weight loss during long-term follow-up. Breast cancer survivors in the LEAN Study, regardless of randomization, avoided long-term weight gain following study completion. View Full-Text
Keywords: breast cancer; survivorship; weight loss maintenance; lifestyle intervention breast cancer; survivorship; weight loss maintenance; lifestyle intervention
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MDPI and ACS Style

Lisevick, A.; Cartmel, B.; Harrigan, M.; Li, F.; Sanft, T.; Fogarasi, M.; Irwin, M.L.; Ferrucci, L.M. Effect of the Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition (LEAN) Study on Long-Term Weight Loss Maintenance in Women with Breast Cancer. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3265. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093265

AMA Style

Lisevick A, Cartmel B, Harrigan M, Li F, Sanft T, Fogarasi M, Irwin ML, Ferrucci LM. Effect of the Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition (LEAN) Study on Long-Term Weight Loss Maintenance in Women with Breast Cancer. Nutrients. 2021; 13(9):3265. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093265

Chicago/Turabian Style

Lisevick, Alexa, Brenda Cartmel, Maura Harrigan, Fangyong Li, Tara Sanft, Miklos Fogarasi, Melinda L. Irwin, and Leah M. Ferrucci 2021. "Effect of the Lifestyle, Exercise, and Nutrition (LEAN) Study on Long-Term Weight Loss Maintenance in Women with Breast Cancer" Nutrients 13, no. 9: 3265. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093265

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