Next Article in Journal
Benefits of Adding an Aquatic Resistance Interval Training to a Nutritional Education on Body Composition, Body Image Perception and Adherence to the Mediterranean Diet in Older Women
Next Article in Special Issue
Dairy Consumption and 3-Year Risk of Type 2 Diabetes after Myocardial Infarction: A Prospective Analysis in the Alpha Omega Cohort
Previous Article in Journal
Gut Microbiota Differences According to Ultra-Processed Food Consumption in a Spanish Population
Previous Article in Special Issue
Habitual Miso (Fermented Soybean Paste) Consumption Is Associated with Glycemic Variability in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-Sectional Study
Article

The Impact of Carbohydrate Quality on Dental Plaque pH: Does the Glycemic Index of Starchy Foods Matter for Dental Health?

1
Charles Perkins Centre, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
2
Charles Perkins Centre, the School of Dentistry, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Equal contribution.
Academic Editor: Laura Chiavaroli
Nutrients 2021, 13(8), 2711; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082711
Received: 7 July 2021 / Revised: 28 July 2021 / Accepted: 3 August 2021 / Published: 6 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Diet Quality and Glycaemia)
Sugary carbohydrate foods have long been associated with increased risk of dental caries formation, but the dental health impact of starchy carbohydrates, particularly those with a high glycemic index (GI), has not been well examined. Aim: To investigate the effect of different starchy foods varying in their GI, on acute changes in dental plaque pH. Methods: In a series of sub-studies in healthy adults, common starchy carbohydrate foods, including white bread, instant mashed potatoes, canned chickpeas, pasta, breakfast cereals, white rice, and an oral glucose solution were consumed in fixed 25 g available carbohydrate portions. The change in dental plaque pH was assessed postprandially over 1 h and capillary plasma glucose was measured at regular intervals over 2 h. Results: Higher GI starchy foods produced greater acute plaque pH decreases and larger overall postprandial glucose responses compared to lower GI starchy foods (white bread compared with canned chickpeas: −1.5 vs. −0.7 pH units, p = 0.001, and 99 ± 8 mmol/L min vs. 47 ± 7 mmol/L min, p = 0.026). Controlling for other food factors (food form and nutritional composition), lower GI versions of matched food pairs produced smaller plaque pH excursions compared to higher GI versions of the same food. Using linear regression analysis, the GI value of starchy carbohydrate foods explained 60% of the variation in maximum plaque pH nadir and 64% of the variation in overall acute dental plaque pH excursion (p < 0.01). Conclusion: The findings imply that starchy foods, in particular those with a higher GI, may play a role in increasing the risk of dental caries. View Full-Text
Keywords: dental plaque pH; glycemic index; dental caries; carbohydrates dental plaque pH; glycemic index; dental caries; carbohydrates
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Atkinson, F.S.; Khan, J.H.; Brand-Miller, J.C.; Eberhard, J. The Impact of Carbohydrate Quality on Dental Plaque pH: Does the Glycemic Index of Starchy Foods Matter for Dental Health? Nutrients 2021, 13, 2711. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082711

AMA Style

Atkinson FS, Khan JH, Brand-Miller JC, Eberhard J. The Impact of Carbohydrate Quality on Dental Plaque pH: Does the Glycemic Index of Starchy Foods Matter for Dental Health? Nutrients. 2021; 13(8):2711. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082711

Chicago/Turabian Style

Atkinson, Fiona S., Jouhrah H. Khan, Jennie C. Brand-Miller, and Joerg Eberhard. 2021. "The Impact of Carbohydrate Quality on Dental Plaque pH: Does the Glycemic Index of Starchy Foods Matter for Dental Health?" Nutrients 13, no. 8: 2711. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13082711

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop