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Article

Internet Access and Nutritional Intake: Evidence from Rural China

1
Institute of Agricultural Economics and Development, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China
2
School of Economics, Shandong University of Technology, Zibo 255049, China
3
College of Economics and Management, Northwest A&F University, Yangling 712100, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jose Lara
Nutrients 2021, 13(6), 2015; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062015
Received: 8 May 2021 / Revised: 29 May 2021 / Accepted: 10 June 2021 / Published: 11 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Over the past 4 decades, China has experienced a nutritional transition and has developed the largest population of internet users. In this study, we evaluated the impacts of internet access on the nutritional intake in Chinese rural residents. An IV-Probit-based propensity score matching method was used to determine the impact of internet access on nutritional intake. The data were collected from 10,042 rural households in six Chinese provinces. The results reveal that rural residents with internet access have significantly higher energy, protein, and fat intake than those without. Chinese rural residents with internet access consumed 1.35% (28.62 kcal), 5.02% (2.61 g), and 4.33% (3.30 g) more energy, protein, and fat, respectively. There was heterogeneity in regard to the intake of energy, protein, and fat among those in different income groups. Moreover, non-staple food consumption is the main channel through which internet access affects nutritional intake. The results demonstrate that the local population uses the internet to improve their nutritional status. Further studies are required to investigate the impact of internet use on food consumed away from home and micronutrient intake. View Full-Text
Keywords: internet access; nutritional intake; rural China; propensity score matching internet access; nutritional intake; rural China; propensity score matching
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MDPI and ACS Style

Xue, P.; Han, X.; Elahi, E.; Zhao, Y.; Wang, X. Internet Access and Nutritional Intake: Evidence from Rural China. Nutrients 2021, 13, 2015. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062015

AMA Style

Xue P, Han X, Elahi E, Zhao Y, Wang X. Internet Access and Nutritional Intake: Evidence from Rural China. Nutrients. 2021; 13(6):2015. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062015

Chicago/Turabian Style

Xue, Ping, Xinru Han, Ehsan Elahi, Yinyu Zhao, and Xiudong Wang. 2021. "Internet Access and Nutritional Intake: Evidence from Rural China" Nutrients 13, no. 6: 2015. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13062015

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