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Article

The Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Response of Pasta in Chinese and Indians Compared to Asian Carbohydrate Staples: Taking Spaghetti Back to Asia

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Clinical Nutrition Research Centre (CNRC), Singapore Institute of Food and Biotechnology Innovation (SIFBI), Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR), Centre for Translational Medicine, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, 14 Medical Drive #07-02, MD 6 Building, Singapore 117599, Singapore
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Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, S14 Level 5, Science Drive 2, Singapore 117543, Singapore
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Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2021, 13(2), 451; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020451
Received: 25 November 2020 / Revised: 8 January 2021 / Accepted: 26 January 2021 / Published: 29 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Metabolism)
In this study, we compared the metabolic properties of the Asian staples rice and noodles, which are typically high in glycaemic index (GI), to two types of spaghetti. It is hypothesised that pasta can be a healthy replacement, particularly amongst the Asian population. Thirty Chinese and Indian subjects (17 men, 13 women; BMI: 18.5–25 kg/m2) participated in this randomised crossover trial. On seven occasions, they consumed a glucose reference drink (3 times), white rice, wheat-based mee pok noodles, semolina spaghetti and wholegrain spaghetti. Blood samples were taken to measure glucose and insulin response over a period of 3 h. The current evaluation showed that semolina spaghetti and wholegrain spaghetti can be classified as low GI products, with a GI of 53 and 54, respectively, significantly lower than wheat based mee pok noodles (74) and rice (80) (p < 0.005). In addition, both spaghettis had a lower insulin response compared to rice (p < 0.05). Furthermore, there was no difference in glucose or insulin response between semolina and wholegrain spaghetti. After controlling for gender, ethnicity, fat and fat free mass (kg), the glucose and insulin results did not change. In conclusion, wheat-based pasta can be helpful to modify the carbohydrate-rich Asian diet. Notably, there was no effect of gender, ethnicity and body composition on the glycaemic and insulinaemic response. We speculate that the starch-protein structure as a result of the spaghetti production process is a major driver of its favourable metabolic properties. View Full-Text
Keywords: Asia; glycaemic index; glucose; insulin; pasta; spaghetti; food structure; rice; noodles Asia; glycaemic index; glucose; insulin; pasta; spaghetti; food structure; rice; noodles
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MDPI and ACS Style

Camps, S.G.; Lim, J.; Koh, M.X.N.; Henry, C.J. The Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Response of Pasta in Chinese and Indians Compared to Asian Carbohydrate Staples: Taking Spaghetti Back to Asia. Nutrients 2021, 13, 451. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020451

AMA Style

Camps SG, Lim J, Koh MXN, Henry CJ. The Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Response of Pasta in Chinese and Indians Compared to Asian Carbohydrate Staples: Taking Spaghetti Back to Asia. Nutrients. 2021; 13(2):451. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020451

Chicago/Turabian Style

Camps, Stefan Gerardus, Joseph Lim, Melvin Xu Nian Koh, and Christiani Jeyakumar Henry. 2021. "The Glycaemic and Insulinaemic Response of Pasta in Chinese and Indians Compared to Asian Carbohydrate Staples: Taking Spaghetti Back to Asia" Nutrients 13, no. 2: 451. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13020451

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