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Article

Exposure of French Children and Adolescents to Advertising for Foods High in Fat, Sugar or Salt

1
Santé Publique France, French National Public Health Agency, 94415 Saint-Maurice, France
2
IMSIC, Aix-Marseille University, 13005 Marseille, France
3
IMSIC, University of Toulon, 83041 Toulon, France
4
Sorbonne Paris Nord University, Inserm U1153, Inrae U1125, Cnam, Nutritional Epidemiology Research Team (EREN), Epidemiology and Statistics Research Center, University of Paris (CRESS), 93000 Bobigny, France
5
Public Health Department, Avicenne Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris (AP-HP), 93000 Bobigny, France
6
French Network for Nutrition and Cancer Research (NACRe Network), 78352 Jouy-en-Josas, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Pedro Moreira
Nutrients 2021, 13(11), 3741; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113741
Received: 9 September 2021 / Revised: 12 October 2021 / Accepted: 20 October 2021 / Published: 23 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Nutrition and Public Health)
Food marketing of products high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS), including television advertising, is one of the environmental factors considered as a contributor to the obesity epidemic. The main objective of this study was to quantify the exposure of French children and adolescents to television advertisements for HFSS products. TV food advertisements broadcast in 2018 were categorized according to the Nutri-Score of the advertised products. These advertisements, identified according to the days and times of broadcast, were cross-referenced with audience data for 4- to 12-year-olds and 13- to 17-year-olds. More than 50% of food advertisements seen on television by children and adolescents concerned HFSS products, identified as classified as Nutri-Score D and E. In addition, half of advertisements for D and E Nutri-Score products were seen by children and adolescents in the evening during peak viewing hours, when more than 20% of both age groups watched television. On the other hand, during the same viewing hours, the percentage of children and adolescents who watched youth programs, the only programs subject to an advertising ban, was very low (<2%). These results show that the relevance of regulating advertising at times when the television audience of children and adolescents is the highest and not targeted at youth programs, in order to reduce their exposure to advertising for products of low nutritional quality. View Full-Text
Keywords: food marketing; food advertising; children; Nutri-Score; television; low nutritional quality; high in fat; salt and/or sugar food marketing; food advertising; children; Nutri-Score; television; low nutritional quality; high in fat; salt and/or sugar
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MDPI and ACS Style

Escalon, H.; Courbet, D.; Julia, C.; Srour, B.; Hercberg, S.; Serry, A.-J. Exposure of French Children and Adolescents to Advertising for Foods High in Fat, Sugar or Salt. Nutrients 2021, 13, 3741. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113741

AMA Style

Escalon H, Courbet D, Julia C, Srour B, Hercberg S, Serry A-J. Exposure of French Children and Adolescents to Advertising for Foods High in Fat, Sugar or Salt. Nutrients. 2021; 13(11):3741. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113741

Chicago/Turabian Style

Escalon, Hélène, Didier Courbet, Chantal Julia, Bernard Srour, Serge Hercberg, and Anne-Juliette Serry. 2021. "Exposure of French Children and Adolescents to Advertising for Foods High in Fat, Sugar or Salt" Nutrients 13, no. 11: 3741. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13113741

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