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Article

Trajectories of Dietary Patterns, Sleep Duration, and Body Mass Index in China: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study from China Nutrition and Health Survey, 1991–2009

by 1,2,†, 3,4,† and 5,*
1
Preclinical Diseases and Prevention, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, VIC 3004, Australia
2
Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC 3000, Australia
3
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia
4
Improving Palliative, Aged and Chronic Care through Clinical Research and Translation, Faculty of Health, University of Technology, Sydney 2007, Australia
5
Human Nutrition Department, College of Health Sciences, QU Health, Qatar University, Doha 2713, Qatar
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2020, 12(8), 2245; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082245
Received: 31 May 2020 / Revised: 5 July 2020 / Accepted: 24 July 2020 / Published: 27 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Effect of Dietary Patterns and Sleep on Body Weight Management)
No study has used trajectories of dietary patterns to examine their effects on sleep duration and body mass index over time in the Chinese population. We analyzed data from adults participating in the China Health and Nutrition Survey between 1991 and 2009. Dietary intake was measured by a 24-h recall method over three consecutive days. Height and body weight were measured, and sleep duration was self-reported. Multivariable mixed linear models were applied to examine the association between trajectories of dietary patterns (using a latent class model) and sleep duration as well as BMI. Four trajectories of a traditional pattern (characterized by rice, meat, and vegetables) and three trajectories of a modern pattern (characterized by fast food, milk, and deep-fried food) were identified. Participants with a high and rapid increase trajectory of the modern dietary pattern had the shortest sleep duration (β = −0.26; 95% CI: −0.40, −0.13). Participants with a high and stable intake of the traditional dietary pattern had the lowest BMI (β = −1.14; 95% CI: −1.41, −0.87), while the participants with a high and rapid increase trajectory of the modern dietary pattern had the highest BMI (β = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.34, 1,15). A rapid increase in the modern dietary pattern is associated with shorter sleep duration and higher BMI. View Full-Text
Keywords: trajectory of dietary patterns; BMI; sleep duration; Chinese adults trajectory of dietary patterns; BMI; sleep duration; Chinese adults
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cao, Y.; Xu, X.; Shi, Z. Trajectories of Dietary Patterns, Sleep Duration, and Body Mass Index in China: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study from China Nutrition and Health Survey, 1991–2009. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2245. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082245

AMA Style

Cao Y, Xu X, Shi Z. Trajectories of Dietary Patterns, Sleep Duration, and Body Mass Index in China: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study from China Nutrition and Health Survey, 1991–2009. Nutrients. 2020; 12(8):2245. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082245

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cao, Yingting, Xiaoyue Xu, and Zumin Shi. 2020. "Trajectories of Dietary Patterns, Sleep Duration, and Body Mass Index in China: A Population-Based Longitudinal Study from China Nutrition and Health Survey, 1991–2009" Nutrients 12, no. 8: 2245. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12082245

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