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Open AccessArticle

Are Sugar-Reduced and Whole Grain Infant Cereals Sensorially Accepted at Weaning? A Randomized Controlled Cross-Over Trial

1
Research and Nutrition Lab, Hero Group, 30820 Murcia, Spain
2
Institute for Research and Nutrition, Hero Group, 5600 Lenzburg, Switzerland
3
Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition Unit, Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca, 30120 Murcia, Spain
4
Institute of Nutrition and Food Technology “José Mataix”, Center of Biomedical Research, University of Granada, Avda. del Conocimiento s/n., 18016 Armilla, Granada, Spain
5
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, School of Pharmacy, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain
6
ibs.GRANADA, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Granada, 18014 Granada, Spain
7
CIBEROBN (CIBER Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, 28029 Madrid, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(6), 1883; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12061883
Received: 18 May 2020 / Revised: 19 June 2020 / Accepted: 22 June 2020 / Published: 24 June 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Healthy Diet and Lifestyles in the Pediatric Population)
The way infants are fed during the complementary period can have a significant impact on infants’ health and development. Infant cereals play an important role in complementary feeding in many countries. In spite of well documented benefits of a low sugar and high whole grain diet, commercial infant cereals are often refined and contain a high amount of sugars. The aim of the present study was to compare the sensory acceptability, gastrointestinal tolerance and bowel habits of two commercially available infant cereals in Spain with varying sugar and whole grain contents in infants at weaning. Forty-six healthy infants (mean age = 5.2 ± 0.4 months) received one of the two infant cereals containing either 0% whole grain flour and a high sugar content produced by starch hydrolysis (24 g/100 g) (Cereal A) or 50% whole grain flour and a medium-sugar content produced by hydrolysis (12 g/100 g) (Cereal B) in a randomized, triple blind, cross-over controlled trial. Both types of infant cereals were consumed for seven weeks. The cross-over was carried out after seven weeks. Sensory acceptability, anthropometry, gastrointestinal tolerance and adverse events were measured, and results evaluated using a linear regression model. No significant differences were observed between groups in any of the main variables analyzed. Importantly, the long-term health implications of our findings represent a wake-up call for the food industry to reduce or even eliminate simple sugars in infant cereals and for regulatory bodies and professional organizations to recommend whole grain infant cereals. View Full-Text
Keywords: cereals; complementary feeding; gastrointestinal tolerance; infancy; infant cereals; sensory acceptability; sugar; sustainable foods; weaning; whole grains cereals; complementary feeding; gastrointestinal tolerance; infancy; infant cereals; sensory acceptability; sugar; sustainable foods; weaning; whole grains
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sanchez-Siles, L.M.; Bernal, M.J.; Gil, D.; Bodenstab, S.; Haro-Vicente, J.F.; Klerks, M.; Plaza-Diaz, J.; Gil, Á. Are Sugar-Reduced and Whole Grain Infant Cereals Sensorially Accepted at Weaning? A Randomized Controlled Cross-Over Trial. Nutrients 2020, 12, 1883.

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