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Article

Maternal Diet Quality, Body Mass Index and Resource Use in the Perinatal Period: An Observational Study

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Hunter Medical Research Institute (HMRI) Lot 1, Kookaburra Circuit, New Lambton Heights, NSW 2305, Australia
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School of Medicine and Public Health, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
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School of Health Sciences, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
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Priority Research Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition, The University of Newcastle, University Drive, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2020, 12(11), 3532; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113532
Received: 29 October 2020 / Revised: 12 November 2020 / Accepted: 13 November 2020 / Published: 17 November 2020
The impact of pre-pregnancy obesity and maternal diet quality on the use of healthcare resources during the perinatal period is underexplored. We assessed the effects of body mass index (BMI) and diet quality on the use of healthcare resources, to identify whether maternal diet quality may be effectively targeted to reduce antenatal heath care resource use, independent of women’s BMI. Cross-sectional data and inpatient medical records were gathered from pregnant women attending publicly funded antenatal outpatient clinics in Newcastle, Australia. Dietary intake was self-reported, using the Australian Eating Survey (AES) food frequency questionnaire, and diet quality was quantified from the AES subscale, the Australian Recommended Food Score (ARFS). Mean pre-pregnancy BMI was 28.8 kg/m2 (range: 14.7 kg/m2–64 kg/m2). Mean ARFS was 28.8 (SD = 13.1). Higher BMI was associated with increased odds of caesarean delivery; women in obese class II (35.0–39.9 kg/m2) had significantly higher odds of caesarean delivery compared to women of normal weight, (OR = 2.13, 95% CI 1.03 to 4.39; p = 0.04). Using Australian Refined Diagnosis Related Group categories for birth admission, the average cost of the birth admission was $1348 more for women in the obese class II, and $1952 more for women in the obese class III, compared to women in a normal BMI weight class. Higher ARFS was associated with a small statistically significant reduction in maternal length of stay (RR = 1.24, 95% CI 1.00, 1.54; p = 0.05). There was no evidence of an association between ARFS and mode of delivery or “midwifery-in-the-home-visits”. View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary assessment; pregnancy; nutrition; economic evaluation; directed acyclic graphs (DAGs); maternal and infant dietary assessment; pregnancy; nutrition; economic evaluation; directed acyclic graphs (DAGs); maternal and infant
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MDPI and ACS Style

Szewczyk, Z.; Weaver, N.; Rollo, M.; Deeming, S.; Holliday, E.; Reeves, P.; Collins, C. Maternal Diet Quality, Body Mass Index and Resource Use in the Perinatal Period: An Observational Study. Nutrients 2020, 12, 3532. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113532

AMA Style

Szewczyk Z, Weaver N, Rollo M, Deeming S, Holliday E, Reeves P, Collins C. Maternal Diet Quality, Body Mass Index and Resource Use in the Perinatal Period: An Observational Study. Nutrients. 2020; 12(11):3532. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113532

Chicago/Turabian Style

Szewczyk, Zoe, Natasha Weaver, Megan Rollo, Simon Deeming, Elizabeth Holliday, Penny Reeves, and Clare Collins. 2020. "Maternal Diet Quality, Body Mass Index and Resource Use in the Perinatal Period: An Observational Study" Nutrients 12, no. 11: 3532. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12113532

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