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A Systematic Review on Socioeconomic Differences in the Association between the Food Environment and Dietary Behaviors

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, 1081HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
2
Department of Public Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Health Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, 1081HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands
4
Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Faculty of Geosciences, Utrecht University, 3584CB Utrecht, The Netherlands
5
Medical Library, Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam, 1105AZ Amsterdam, The Netherlands
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Nutrients 2019, 11(9), 2215; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11092215
Received: 20 August 2019 / Revised: 6 September 2019 / Accepted: 9 September 2019 / Published: 13 September 2019
Little is known about socioeconomic differences in the association between the food environment and dietary behavior. We systematically reviewed four databases for original studies conducted in adolescents and adults. Food environments were defined as all objective and perceived aspects of the physical and economic food environment outside the home. The 43 included studies were diverse in the measures used to define the food environment, socioeconomic position (SEP) and dietary behavior, as well as in their results. Based on studies investigating the economic (n = 6) and school food environment (n = 4), somewhat consistent evidence suggests that low SEP individuals are more responsive to changes in food prices and benefit more from healthy options in the school food environment. Evidence for different effects of availability of foods and objectively measured access, proximity and quality of food stores on dietary behavior across SEP groups was inconsistent. In conclusion, there was no clear evidence for socioeconomic differences in the association between food environments and dietary behavior, although a limited number of studies focusing on economic and school food environments generally observed stronger associations in low SEP populations. (Prospero registration: CRD42017073587) View Full-Text
Keywords: dietary intake; effect modification; food prices; food retailers; interaction; SES; socio-economic position dietary intake; effect modification; food prices; food retailers; interaction; SES; socio-economic position
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Mackenbach, J.D.; Nelissen, K.G.M.; Dijkstra, S.C.; Poelman, M.P.; Daams, J.G.; Leijssen, J.B.; Nicolaou, M. A Systematic Review on Socioeconomic Differences in the Association between the Food Environment and Dietary Behaviors. Nutrients 2019, 11, 2215.

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