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Open AccessArticle

Breastfeeding Status and Duration and Infections, Hospitalizations for Infections, and Antibiotic Use in the First Two Years of Life in the ELFE Cohort

1
Université de Paris, CRESS, INSERM, INRA F-75004 Paris, France
2
UMR Service de Pharmacologie et Immunoanalyse, CEA, INRA, Université Paris-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, France
3
Unité d’allergologie pédiatrique, Hôpital d’enfants, CHRU de Nancy, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France
4
EA3450, DevAH-Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Lorraine, 54500 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy, France
5
Ined, Inserm, Joint Unit Elfe F-75020 Paris, France
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(7), 1607; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11071607
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 3 July 2019 / Accepted: 11 July 2019 / Published: 15 July 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breastfeeding: Short and Long-Term Benefits to Baby and Mother)
In low- and middle-income countries, the protective effect of breastfeeding against infections is well established, but in high-income countries, the effect could be weakened by higher hygienic conditions. We aimed to examine the association between breastfeeding and infections in the first 2 years of life, in a high-income country with relatively short breastfeeding duration. Among 10,349 young children from the nationwide Etude Longitudinale Française depuis l’Enfance (ELFE) birth cohort, breastfeeding and parent-reported hospitalizations, bronchiolitis and otitis events, and antibiotic use were prospectively collected up to 2 years. Never-breastfed infants were used as reference group. Any breastfeeding for <3 months was associated with higher risks of hospitalizations from gastrointestinal infections or fever. Predominant breastfeeding for <1 month was associated with higher risk of a single hospital admission while predominant breastfeeding for ≥3 months was associated with a lower risk of long duration (≥4 nights) of hospitalization. Ever breastfeeding was associated with lower risk of antibiotic use. This study confirmed the well-known associations between breastfeeding and hospitalizations but also highlighted a strong inverse association between breastfeeding and antibiotic use. Although we cannot infer causality from this observational study, this finding is worth highlighting in a context of rising concern regarding antibiotic resistance. View Full-Text
Keywords: breastfeeding; infections; birth cohort; hospitalizations; antibiotic use breastfeeding; infections; birth cohort; hospitalizations; antibiotic use
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Davisse-Paturet, C.; Adel-Patient, K.; Divaret-Chauveau, A.; Pierson, J.; Lioret, S.; Cheminat, M.; Dufourg, M.-N.; Charles, M.-A.; de Lauzon-Guillain, B. Breastfeeding Status and Duration and Infections, Hospitalizations for Infections, and Antibiotic Use in the First Two Years of Life in the ELFE Cohort. Nutrients 2019, 11, 1607.

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