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Open AccessArticle

Preconception Folic Acid Supplement Use in Immigrant Women (1999–2016)

1
Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, Western Norway University of Applied Sciences, Inndalsveien, 28, 5063 Bergen, Norway
2
Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, University of Bergen, Kalfarveien 31, 5018 Bergen, Norway
3
Division of Health Data and Digitalisation, Norwegian Institute for Public Health, Zander Kaaesgate 7, 5018 Bergen, Norway
4
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haukeland University Hospital, Jonas Lies vei 72, 5053 Bergen, Norway
5
Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Uppsala University, Nissers väg 3, 791 82 Falun, Sweden
6
Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Karolinska Institute, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2019, 11(10), 2300; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102300
Received: 30 August 2019 / Revised: 20 September 2019 / Accepted: 24 September 2019 / Published: 27 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prenatal Development and Nutrition Intake)
This study examines how preconception folic acid supplement use varied in immigrant women compared with non-immigrant women. We analyzed national population-based data from Norway from 1999–2016, including 1,055,886 pregnancies, of which 202,234 and 7,965 were to 1st and 2nd generation immigrant women, respectively. Folic acid supplement use was examined in relation to generational immigrant category, maternal country of birth, and length of residence. Folic acid supplement use was lower overall in 1st and 2nd generation immigrant women (21% and 26%, respectively) compared with Norwegian-born women (29%). The lowest use among 1st generation immigrant women was seen in those from Eritrea, Ethiopia, Morocco, and Somalia (around 10%). The highest use was seen in immigrant women from the United States, the Netherlands, Denmark, and Iceland (>30%). Folic acid supplement use increased with increasing length of residence in immigrant women from most countries, but the overall prevalence was lower compared with Norwegian-born women even after 20 years of residence (adjusted odds ratio: 0.63; 95% confidence interval: 0.60–0.67). This study suggests that immigrant women from a number of countries are less likely to use preconception folic acid supplements than non-immigrant women, even many years after settlement. View Full-Text
Keywords: country of birth; ethnicity; folate; folic acid; immigrant; length of residence; migrant; neural tube defects; Norway; pregnancy; vitamins country of birth; ethnicity; folate; folic acid; immigrant; length of residence; migrant; neural tube defects; Norway; pregnancy; vitamins
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MDPI and ACS Style

Nilsen, R.M.; Daltveit, A.K.; Iversen, M.M.; Sandberg, M.G.; Schytt, E.; Small, R.; Strandberg, R.B.; Vik, E.S.; Aasheim, V. Preconception Folic Acid Supplement Use in Immigrant Women (1999–2016). Nutrients 2019, 11, 2300. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102300

AMA Style

Nilsen RM, Daltveit AK, Iversen MM, Sandberg MG, Schytt E, Small R, Strandberg RB, Vik ES, Aasheim V. Preconception Folic Acid Supplement Use in Immigrant Women (1999–2016). Nutrients. 2019; 11(10):2300. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102300

Chicago/Turabian Style

Nilsen, Roy M.; Daltveit, Anne K.; Iversen, Marjolein M.; Sandberg, Marit G.; Schytt, Erica; Small, Rhonda; Strandberg, Ragnhild B.; Vik, Eline S.; Aasheim, Vigdis. 2019. "Preconception Folic Acid Supplement Use in Immigrant Women (1999–2016)" Nutrients 11, no. 10: 2300. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11102300

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