Next Article in Journal
Glucoregulatory and Cardiometabolic Profiles of Almond vs. Cracker Snacking for 8 Weeks in Young Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Previous Article in Journal
Relationship between Diet and Mental Health in a Young Adult Appalachian College Population
Open AccessArticle

Description of Child and Adolescent Beverage and Anthropometric Measures According to Adolescent Beverage Patterns

1
Department of Preventive & Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
2
Department of Biostatistics, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
3
Department of Statistics and Actuarial Science, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
4
Department of Pediatrics, Division of Critical Care, School of Medicine, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84132, USA
5
Department of Preventive & Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry, and Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(8), 958; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10080958
Received: 21 June 2018 / Revised: 13 July 2018 / Accepted: 20 July 2018 / Published: 25 July 2018
Our objective is to retrospectively describe longitudinal beverage intakes and anthropometric measures according to adolescent beverage patterns. Data were collected from Iowa Fluoride Study participants (n = 369) using beverage questionnaires at ages 2–17 years. Weight and height were measured at ages 5, 9, 13 and 17 years. Cluster analyses were used to identify age 13- to 17-year beverage patterns. Treating age and beverage cluster as explanatory factors, sex-specific generalized linear mixed models were used to identify when differences in beverage intakes and anthropometric measures began. Predominant beverage intakes were higher in each of the corresponding clusters by 9–12.5 years; females with high milk intakes during adolescence and males with high 100% juice or sugar-sweetened beverage intakes during adolescence reported higher intakes of that beverage beginning at 2–4.7 years. Females and males in the 100% juice cluster had lower weights than other clusters beginning at 13 years, while females and males in the neutral cluster were shorter beginning at 13 years. Females in the water/sugar-free beverage cluster had higher body mass indices (BMIs) beginning at 9 years. Females and males in the 100% juice cluster had lower BMIs beginning at 5 and 9 years, respectively. Childhood beverage intakes and growth patterns differ according to adolescent beverage patterns. View Full-Text
Keywords: beverage; height; body mass index; children beverage; height; body mass index; children
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Marshall, T.A.; Curtis, A.M.; Cavanaugh, J.E.; VanBuren, J.M.; Warren, J.J.; Levy, S.M. Description of Child and Adolescent Beverage and Anthropometric Measures According to Adolescent Beverage Patterns. Nutrients 2018, 10, 958.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop