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Open AccessArticle

Olive Oil and Soybean Oil Based Intravenous Lipid Emulsions, Liver Biochemistry and Clinical Outcomes

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Department of Nutrition Services, Alberta Health Services, 3500 26 Ave NE, Calgary, AB T1Y 6J4, Canada
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Community Health Sciences, Institute of Public Health, G055 3330 Hospital Drive, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada
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Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, G055 3330 Hospital Drive, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(6), 658; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10060658
Received: 3 April 2018 / Revised: 5 May 2018 / Accepted: 17 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
Intravenous lipid emulsions are an essential component of parenteral nutrition (PN). Omega-6 reducing strategies may improve outcomes, including reduced PN associated liver disease, however evidence to support this recommendation is insufficient. The primary objective was to compare serum alkaline phosphatase (ALP), among patients provided with either soybean oil (Intralipid) or predominantly olive oil (Clinoleic) lipid emulsions. In this quasi-experimental study, we reviewed the medical records of surgical and medical adult patients who received lipid emulsions for at least seven consecutive days. Among the 206 patients (110—Intralipid, 96—Clinoleic) there was no significant difference in ALP and remaining liver function tests within 2 weeks of PN therapy initiation between groups, even after control for lipid doses. Macronutrient dosing was similar. Triglyceride level was higher by 0.7 mmol/L in the Clinoleic group; confidence interval 0.21 to 1.1; p = 0.004. The 30-day mortality, length of hospital stay, and proportion of patients admitted to intensive care were not significantly different. The Clinoleic group had a higher infection rate (36% vs. 22%, p = 0.031) and longer intensive care stays (p = 0.045). Well-designed randomized clinical trials comparing these lipid emulsions are necessary to confirm Intralipid superiority over Clinoleic in relation to infections and serum triglycerides. View Full-Text
Keywords: IV lipid emulsion; olive oil; parenteral nutrition; soybean oil; Intralipid; Clinoleic IV lipid emulsion; olive oil; parenteral nutrition; soybean oil; Intralipid; Clinoleic
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Araujo, F.; Fenton, T.R.; Lukmanji, S.; Raman, M. Olive Oil and Soybean Oil Based Intravenous Lipid Emulsions, Liver Biochemistry and Clinical Outcomes. Nutrients 2018, 10, 658.

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