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Open AccessArticle

Anthropometric and Dietary Factors as Predictors of DNA Damage in Obese Women

1
Department of Biochemistry and Pharmacogenomics, Faculty of Pharmacy with Division of Laboratory Medicine, Medical University of Warsaw, Banacha 1B, 02-097 Warsaw, Poland
2
Centre for Preclinical Research, Medical University of Warsaw, Banacha 1B, 02-097 Warsaw, Poland
3
Centre of Promotion of Heathy Nutrition and Physical Activity, National Food and Nutrition Institute, Powsinska 61/63, 02-903 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Nutrients 2018, 10(5), 578; https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10050578
Received: 29 March 2018 / Revised: 25 April 2018 / Accepted: 1 May 2018 / Published: 8 May 2018
Enhanced DNA damage and disturbances in DNA repair mechanisms are reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of chronic diseases like obesity, atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cancer. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether anthropometric factors and dietary habits are related to endogenous DNA damage. One hundred and fourteen premenopausal, apparently healthy women were included in the study: 88 obese individuals and 26 controls. The comet assay was used to measure basal DNA damage. Biochemical measurements included lipids, apolipoproteinAI, fasting insulin, glucose, and C-reactive protein high sensitivity (CRP-hs). Dietary intakes were assessed by 3-day food records. The mean level of DNA damage was almost two times higher in obese than in non-obese women (p < 0.001). Regression modeling showed that body mass index (BMI), daily intakes of energy, and vitamin C are key predictors of variance in basal DNA damage. Our data demonstrate the impact of obesity-associated inflammation on DNA damage and indicate that regardless of obesity, the level of DNA damage can be reduced by adequate intakes of vitamins C and E. It suggests that particular attention should be paid to the content of antioxidants in the diet of obese people and further studies are needed to modify dietary guidelines to prevent DNA damage in obese individuals. View Full-Text
Keywords: DNA damage; obesity; dietary intake; vitamin C; vitamin E DNA damage; obesity; dietary intake; vitamin C; vitamin E
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Włodarczyk, M.; Jabłonowska-Lietz, B.; Olejarz, W.; Nowicka, G. Anthropometric and Dietary Factors as Predictors of DNA Damage in Obese Women. Nutrients 2018, 10, 578.

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