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Article

Drone-Based Remote Sensing for Research on Wind Erosion in Drylands: Possible Applications

1
Department of Geography, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
2
Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Remote Sens. 2021, 13(2), 283; https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020283
Received: 8 November 2020 / Revised: 28 December 2020 / Accepted: 6 January 2021 / Published: 15 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Remote Sensing of Dryland Environment)
With rapid innovations in drone, camera, and 3D photogrammetry, drone-based remote sensing can accurately and efficiently provide ultra-high resolution imagery and digital surface model (DSM) at a landscape scale. Several studies have been conducted using drone-based remote sensing to quantitatively assess the impacts of wind erosion on the vegetation communities and landforms in drylands. In this study, first, five difficulties in conducting wind erosion research through data collection from fieldwork are summarized: insufficient samples, spatial displacement with auxiliary datasets, missing volumetric information, a unidirectional view, and spatially inexplicit input. Then, five possible applications—to provide a reliable and valid sample set, to mitigate the spatial offset, to monitor soil elevation change, to evaluate the directional property of land cover, and to make spatially explicit input for ecological models—of drone-based remote sensing products are suggested. To sum up, drone-based remote sensing has become a useful method to research wind erosion in drylands, and can solve the issues caused by using data collected from fieldwork. For wind erosion research in drylands, we suggest that a drone-based remote sensing product should be used as a complement to field measurements. View Full-Text
Keywords: drone-based remote sensing; wind erosion; resampling; spatial displacement; volumetric information; directional property; spatially explicit input drone-based remote sensing; wind erosion; resampling; spatial displacement; volumetric information; directional property; spatially explicit input
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zhang, J.; Guo, W.; Zhou, B.; Okin, G.S. Drone-Based Remote Sensing for Research on Wind Erosion in Drylands: Possible Applications. Remote Sens. 2021, 13, 283. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020283

AMA Style

Zhang J, Guo W, Zhou B, Okin GS. Drone-Based Remote Sensing for Research on Wind Erosion in Drylands: Possible Applications. Remote Sensing. 2021; 13(2):283. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020283

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zhang, Junzhe, Wei Guo, Bo Zhou, and Gregory S. Okin. 2021. "Drone-Based Remote Sensing for Research on Wind Erosion in Drylands: Possible Applications" Remote Sensing 13, no. 2: 283. https://doi.org/10.3390/rs13020283

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