Next Article in Journal
Contribution of Family, Behavioral, and Neuropsychological Factors to Long-Term Functional Outcomes in Young Adults with ADHD: A 12-Year Follow-Up Study
Next Article in Special Issue
Design Considerations for Residents with Impeded Cognitive Functioning: Conversations with People with Schizophrenia
Previous Article in Journal
Go/No-Go Decision Model for Owners Using Exhaustive CHAID and QUEST Decision Tree Algorithms
Previous Article in Special Issue
Modelling VOC Emissions from Building Materials for Healthy Building Design
Review

The Potential of Biophilic Fractal Designs to Promote Health and Performance: A Review of Experiments and Applications

Physics Department, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA
Sustainability 2021, 13(2), 823; https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020823
Received: 3 December 2020 / Revised: 7 January 2021 / Accepted: 12 January 2021 / Published: 15 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Architecture and Salutogenesis: Beyond Indoor Environmental Quality)
Fractal objects are prevalent in natural scenery. Their repetition of patterns at increasingly fine magnifications creates a rich complexity. Fractals displaying mid-range complexity are the most common and include trees, clouds, and mountains. The “fractal fluency” model states that human vision has adapted to process these mid-range fractals with ease. I will first discuss fractal fluency and demonstrate how it enhances the observer’s visual capabilities by focusing on experiments that have important practical consequences for improving the built environment. These enhanced capabilities generate an aesthetic experience and physiological stress reduction. I will discuss strategies for integrating fractals into building designs to induce positive impacts on the observer. Examples include fractal solar panels, fractal window shades, and fractal floor patterns. These applications of fractal fluency represent a fundamental and potentially impactful form of salutogenesis. View Full-Text
Keywords: aesthetics; biophilia; fractals; human-centered design; stress-reduction aesthetics; biophilia; fractals; human-centered design; stress-reduction
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Taylor, R.P. The Potential of Biophilic Fractal Designs to Promote Health and Performance: A Review of Experiments and Applications. Sustainability 2021, 13, 823. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020823

AMA Style

Taylor RP. The Potential of Biophilic Fractal Designs to Promote Health and Performance: A Review of Experiments and Applications. Sustainability. 2021; 13(2):823. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020823

Chicago/Turabian Style

Taylor, Richard P. 2021. "The Potential of Biophilic Fractal Designs to Promote Health and Performance: A Review of Experiments and Applications" Sustainability 13, no. 2: 823. https://doi.org/10.3390/su13020823

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop