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Open AccessArticle

Who Benefits? How Interest-Convergence Shapes Benefit-Sharing and Indigenous Rights to Sustainable Livelihoods in Russia

1
Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
2
The Centre for Independent Social Research, 190041 Saint Petersburg, Russia
3
Environmental Policy Group, Wageningen University, 6706KN Wageningen, The Netherlands
4
Department of Government and Legal Studies, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, ME 04011, USA
5
North-West Institute of Management, Faculty of International Relations and Politics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, 197101 Saint Petersburg, Russia
6
School of Human Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(21), 9025; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219025
Received: 8 October 2020 / Revised: 22 October 2020 / Accepted: 23 October 2020 / Published: 30 October 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Sustainable Use of the Environment and Resources)
The paper examines interactions of oil companies and reindeer herders in the tundra of the Russian Arctic. We focus on governance arrangements that have an impact on the sustainability of oil production and reindeer herding. We analyze a shift in benefit-sharing arrangements between oil companies and Indigenous Nenets reindeer herders in Nenets Autonomous Okrug (NAO), Russia, as an evolution of the herders’ rights, defined as the intertwined co-production of legal processes, ideologies, and power relations. Semi-structured interviews, participant observation, and document analysis demonstrate that in NAO, benefit-sharing shifted from paternalism (dependent on herders’ negotiation skills) to company-centered social responsibility (formalized compensation rules). This shift was enabled by the adoption of a formal methodology for calculating income lost due to extractive projects and facilitated by the regional government’s efforts to develop reindeer-herding. While laws per se did not change, herders’ ability to access compensation and markets increased. This paper shows that even when ideologies of indigeneity are not influential, the use of existing laws and convergence of the government’s and Indigenous groups’ economic interests may shift legal processes and power relations toward greater rights for Indigenous groups. View Full-Text
Keywords: Arctic; benefit-sharing; sustainability; corporate social responsibility; indigenous reindeer herders’ rights; triple-helix model: power-law-indigeneity Arctic; benefit-sharing; sustainability; corporate social responsibility; indigenous reindeer herders’ rights; triple-helix model: power-law-indigeneity
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MDPI and ACS Style

Tysiachniouk, M.S.; Henry, L.A.; Tulaeva, S.A.; Horowitz, L.S. Who Benefits? How Interest-Convergence Shapes Benefit-Sharing and Indigenous Rights to Sustainable Livelihoods in Russia. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9025. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219025

AMA Style

Tysiachniouk MS, Henry LA, Tulaeva SA, Horowitz LS. Who Benefits? How Interest-Convergence Shapes Benefit-Sharing and Indigenous Rights to Sustainable Livelihoods in Russia. Sustainability. 2020; 12(21):9025. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219025

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tysiachniouk, Maria S.; Henry, Laura A.; Tulaeva, Svetlana A.; Horowitz, Leah S. 2020. "Who Benefits? How Interest-Convergence Shapes Benefit-Sharing and Indigenous Rights to Sustainable Livelihoods in Russia" Sustainability 12, no. 21: 9025. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12219025

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