Next Article in Journal
Influences of Behavioral Intention to Engage in Environmental Accounting Practices for Corporate Sustainability: Managerial Perspectives from a Developing Country
Previous Article in Journal
The Possibilities of Preservation, Regeneration and Presentation of Industrial Heritage: The Case of Old Mint “A.D.” on Belgrade Riverfront
Open AccessArticle

Energy and Environmental Comparison between a Concrete Wall with and without a Living Green Wall: A Case Study in Mexicali, Mexico

1
Instituto de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali 21280, Mexico
2
Facultad de Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali 21280, Mexico
3
Facultad de Arquitectura y Diseño, Universidad Autónoma de Baja California, Mexicali 21280, Mexico
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(13), 5265; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12135265
Received: 3 March 2020 / Revised: 26 March 2020 / Accepted: 31 March 2020 / Published: 29 June 2020
In cities with dry arid climate, air conditioning (AC) equipment is necessary for thermal comfort in indoor spaces. The use of this equipment generates an increase in electricity consumption and an increment in CO₂ emissions to the environment; thus, one way to mitigate these negative effects is the Living Green Wall (LGW). The objective of this research is to assess the decrease in thermal gain, energy benefits, and estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that are not emitted by the use of the LGW. Measurements of heat flux, solar radiation, and temperatures were made on a concrete wall and another with an LGW in a west-facing building in the city of Mexicali, Mexico. The results indicate that it is possible to reduce 49% of the heat flow through the wall, which reduces the thermal load 102,212 Btu/h to the indoor space, implying the additional work of 8.53 tons of AC. This excess equals 985.6 kWh of electrical energy and generates a total of 697 kg of CO₂ emissions during the warm season. It is concluded that shading with an LWG becomes a very influential element to mitigate the heat fluxes towards the indoor spaces. View Full-Text
Keywords: temperature; greenhouse gas emissions; heat fluxes; living green wall temperature; greenhouse gas emissions; heat fluxes; living green wall
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Campos-Osorio, A.; Santillán-Soto, N.; García-Cueto, O.R.; Lambert-Arista, A.A.; Bojórquez-Morales, G. Energy and Environmental Comparison between a Concrete Wall with and without a Living Green Wall: A Case Study in Mexicali, Mexico. Sustainability 2020, 12, 5265.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop