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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle

Wild Bee Conservation within Urban Gardens and Nurseries: Effects of Local and Landscape Management

1
Department of Ecology, Ecosystem Science/Plant Ecology, Technische Universität Berlin, Rothenburgstr. 12, 12165 Berlin, Germany
2
Department of Environmental Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High St., Santa Cruz, CA 95060, USA
3
Department of Entomology, University of California, 900 University Ave, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2020, 12(1), 293; https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010293
Received: 30 October 2019 / Revised: 11 December 2019 / Accepted: 27 December 2019 / Published: 30 December 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Urban Development)
Across urban environments, vegetated habitats provide refuge for biodiversity. Gardens (designed for food crop production) and nurseries (designed for ornamental plant production) are both urban agricultural habitats characterized by high plant species richness but may vary in their ability to support wild pollinators, particularly bees. In gardens, pollinators are valued for crop production. In nurseries, ornamental plants rarely require pollination; thus, the potential of nurseries to support pollinators has not been examined. We asked how these habitats vary in their ability to support wild bees, and what habitat features relate to this variability. In 19 gardens and 11 nurseries in California, USA, we compared how local habitat and landscape features affected wild bee species abundance and richness. To assess local features, we estimated floral richness and measured ground cover as proxies for food and nesting resources, respectively. To assess landscape features, we measured impervious land cover surrounding each site. Our analyses showed that differences in floral richness, local habitat size, and the amount of urban land cover impacted garden wild bee species richness. In nurseries, floral richness and the proportion of native plant species impacted wild bee abundance and richness. We suggest management guidelines for supporting wild pollinators in both habitats. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban agriculture; horticulture; pollinators; California; native plants urban agriculture; horticulture; pollinators; California; native plants
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MDPI and ACS Style

Egerer, M.; Cecala, J.M.; Cohen, H. Wild Bee Conservation within Urban Gardens and Nurseries: Effects of Local and Landscape Management. Sustainability 2020, 12, 293. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010293

AMA Style

Egerer M, Cecala JM, Cohen H. Wild Bee Conservation within Urban Gardens and Nurseries: Effects of Local and Landscape Management. Sustainability. 2020; 12(1):293. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010293

Chicago/Turabian Style

Egerer, Monika; Cecala, Jacob M.; Cohen, Hamutahl. 2020. "Wild Bee Conservation within Urban Gardens and Nurseries: Effects of Local and Landscape Management" Sustainability 12, no. 1: 293. https://doi.org/10.3390/su12010293

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