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Consumption and Emissions Analysis in Domestic Hot Water Hotels. Case Study: Canary Islands

1
Universidad San Jorge, 50830 Zaragoza, Spain
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Faculty of Technical Sciences and Engineering, Universidad a Distancia de Madrid (UDIMA), 28400 Madrid, Spain
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Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Universidad Complutenese de Madrid, 28040 Madrid, Spain
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ESCOEX, Universidad del Atlántico Medio, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
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Electric engineering, Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canarias, 35001 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(3), 599; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030599
Received: 3 January 2019 / Revised: 19 January 2019 / Accepted: 21 January 2019 / Published: 23 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Energy Sustainability)
We analyze the energy consumption of domestic hot water (DHW) in the hotels of the archipelago of the Canary Islands (Spain). Currently, systems use fossil fuels of propane and gas oil. However, this paper analyzes several alternative systems which focus on renewable and mixed energies, such as biomass, solar thermal and heat pumps systems associated with an electric generation with photovoltaic solar panels for self-consumption. The carbon footprint generated is calculated for each method of generation of DHW. In our analysis, we demonstrate that by using a high-temperature heat pump with an average coefficient of performance (COP) equal to or greater than 4.4 associated with photovoltaic solar panels, a zero-emission domestic hot water system can be achieved, when the installation area of the photovoltaic solar panels is equal to that of the solar thermal system. The importance of DHW’s carbon footprint is proven, as is the efficiency of using high-temperature heat pumps associated with photovoltaic solar panels. As such, such mixed system suggests that the generation of DHW would have zero emissions with maximum annual savings according to hotel occupancy, between 112,417 and 137,644 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2), compared to current boilers based on fossil fuels. View Full-Text
Keywords: Carbon Footprint; DHW; biomass; photovoltaic; solar thermal; heat pump Carbon Footprint; DHW; biomass; photovoltaic; solar thermal; heat pump
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MDPI and ACS Style

Díaz Pérez, F.J.; Díaz Martín, R.; Pérez Trujillo, F.J.; Díaz, M.; Mouhaffel, A.G. Consumption and Emissions Analysis in Domestic Hot Water Hotels. Case Study: Canary Islands. Sustainability 2019, 11, 599. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030599

AMA Style

Díaz Pérez FJ, Díaz Martín R, Pérez Trujillo FJ, Díaz M, Mouhaffel AG. Consumption and Emissions Analysis in Domestic Hot Water Hotels. Case Study: Canary Islands. Sustainability. 2019; 11(3):599. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030599

Chicago/Turabian Style

Díaz Pérez, Francisco J., Ricardo Díaz Martín, Francisco J. Pérez Trujillo, Moises Díaz, and Adib G. Mouhaffel. 2019. "Consumption and Emissions Analysis in Domestic Hot Water Hotels. Case Study: Canary Islands" Sustainability 11, no. 3: 599. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11030599

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