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Article

Amelioration of Composts for Greenhouse Vegetable Plants Using Pasteurised Agaricus Mushroom Substrate

1
Lindum AS, 3036 Drammen, Norway
2
Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research (NIBIO), Ås 1431 Tromsø, Norway
3
Department of Vegetable Crops, Faculty of Horticulture, Poznan University of Life Sciences, 60-594 Poznań, Poland
4
Pershore College, Warwickshire College Group, Pershore WR10 3JP, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sustainability 2019, 11(23), 6779; https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236779
Received: 4 November 2019 / Revised: 21 November 2019 / Accepted: 25 November 2019 / Published: 29 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Suitable Agronomic Techniques for Sustainable Agriculture)
When using food and green waste composts as peat-free plant growing media, there is a challenge that nutrient immobilisation and high pH and salts content limit plant growth. The present study explored the use of spent mushroom compost (SMC) of Agaricus subrufescens in a sustainable plant growing system where only vermicompost from digested food waste and composted green wastes were used, even for the seedling stage. However, negative effects of high compost inclusion were offset by adding SMC. Significantly higher plant yield was obtained in several of the SMC amended treatments in four out of five lettuce experiments and in one tomato experiment. In addition, an experiment with cucumbers showed that nutrients were not available to the plant when the mushroom mycelium was actively growing, but became available if the mushroom mycelium had been inactivated first by pasteurisation. A significant effect from SMC was not observed under full fertigation. This study demonstrated that the addition of pasteurised Agaricus mycelium colonised compost can successfully offset negative effects from high pH and EC as well as limited nutrient supply (and nitrogen immobilisation) in peat-free, compost-based growing media. View Full-Text
Keywords: peat-free growing media; spent mushroom compost; sustainable horticulture; vermicompost; green waste; urban agriculture; vegetable cultivation; digestate peat-free growing media; spent mushroom compost; sustainable horticulture; vermicompost; green waste; urban agriculture; vegetable cultivation; digestate
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MDPI and ACS Style

Stoknes, K.; Wojciechowska, E.; Jasinska, A.; Noble, R. Amelioration of Composts for Greenhouse Vegetable Plants Using Pasteurised Agaricus Mushroom Substrate. Sustainability 2019, 11, 6779. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236779

AMA Style

Stoknes K, Wojciechowska E, Jasinska A, Noble R. Amelioration of Composts for Greenhouse Vegetable Plants Using Pasteurised Agaricus Mushroom Substrate. Sustainability. 2019; 11(23):6779. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236779

Chicago/Turabian Style

Stoknes, Ketil, Ewelina Wojciechowska, Agnieszka Jasinska, and Ralph Noble. 2019. "Amelioration of Composts for Greenhouse Vegetable Plants Using Pasteurised Agaricus Mushroom Substrate" Sustainability 11, no. 23: 6779. https://doi.org/10.3390/su11236779

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