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Infectious Disease Reports is published by MDPI from Volume 12 Issue 3 (2020). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.
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Infect. Dis. Rep., Volume 8, Issue 4 (December 2016) – 4 articles

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Case Report
A Case Report of Neisseria mucosa Peritonitis in a Chronic Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Patient
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(4), 83-84; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6950 - 31 Dec 2016
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 159
Abstract
Peritonitis is a leading complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. However, very rarely does Neisseria mucosa cause peritonitis. We describe an unusual case of N. mucosa peritonitis in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient. A 28-year-old Hispanic male presents with diffuse abdominal [...] Read more.
Peritonitis is a leading complication of chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis. However, very rarely does Neisseria mucosa cause peritonitis. We describe an unusual case of N. mucosa peritonitis in a chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patient. A 28-year-old Hispanic male presents with diffuse abdominal pain exacerbated during draining of the peritoneal fluid. Peritoneal fluid examination was remarkable for leukocytosis and gramnegative diplococci. Bacterial cultures were positive for N. mucosa growth. The patient was treated with ciprofloxacin with preservation of the dialysis catheter. This case highlights the rarity and importance of Neisseria mucosa causing peritonitis in chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. There seems to be a unique association between N. mucosa peritonitis and chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis patients’. The patient was successfully managed with ciprofloxacin along with salvaging of the dialysis catheter. Full article
Case Report
Asymptomatic Epstein-Barr virus Ahedding in the Urine of Kidney Transplant Recipients: Case Reports and Review of the Literature
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(4), 80-82; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6817 - 31 Dec 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 146
Abstract
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a wide range of malignancies and complications like post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). To suppress active EBV infection in transplant recipients, who are at a heightened risk of developing PTLD, EBV DNAemia monitoring has been recommended. Quantitative multiplex [...] Read more.
Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a wide range of malignancies and complications like post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD). To suppress active EBV infection in transplant recipients, who are at a heightened risk of developing PTLD, EBV DNAemia monitoring has been recommended. Quantitative multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction (QMRTPCR) offered the advantage of detection of more than one target in the same sample. We present four cases of kidney transplant recipient who were admitted for rising serum creatinine between 9 and 20 months post-transplant with a suspicion of BKV-associated nephropathy. All but one patient had unusual sonography findings in their genitourinary tracts and were positive for urinary culture for bacteria. Using a commercial QMRTPCR that could detect and quantitate BKV, EBV and cytomegalovirus simultaneously, all patients were positive for EBV in their urine for the levels between 2500 and 8×108 U/mL. None of the patients had any symptoms regarding this finding. On following up survey 3 month post discharge from hospital, all patients were negative for plasma and urine EBV. Absent of EBV DNAemia together with alternating phases of detectable EBV in urine might reflect the presence of functionally efficient central/effector memory T cells against EBV. The significance of this finding in immunocompromized patients necessitates prospective longitudinal studies. Full article
Case Report
Leishmania infantum and Epstein-Barr virus Co-Infection in a Patient with Hemophagocytosis
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(4), 78-79; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6545 - 31 Dec 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 159
Abstract
The authors describe a rare case of a 27-year old previously healthy male presenting with high grade fever, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, high levels of ferritin and triglyceride, suggesting a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) syndrome. Other investigations showed a positive Leishmania infantum serology and [...] Read more.
The authors describe a rare case of a 27-year old previously healthy male presenting with high grade fever, pancytopenia, hepatosplenomegaly, high levels of ferritin and triglyceride, suggesting a diagnosis of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) syndrome. Other investigations showed a positive Leishmania infantum serology and high Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia. The diagnosis of a visceral leishmaniasis was confirmed by bone morrow biopsy, which showed Leishman-Donovan bodies and evidence of HLH. The patient received liposomal amphotericin B and he had a complete resolution of his symptoms and clearance of EBV viremia. This case of HLH associated with visceral leishmaniasis and EBV co-infection raises the question about the significance of EBV in patients with HLH. The treatment of actual etiological agent can lead to complete cure while using current recommend chemotherapy for HLH-related EBV in a patient with hidden infection may have deleterious effects. Full article
Case Report
Streptococcus pneumoniae Intracranial Abscess and Post-Infectious Vasculitis
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(4), 76-77; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6844 - 31 Dec 2016
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 153
Abstract
Intracranial abscesses are rare complications of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, and to our knowledge, there have been no case reports of post-infectious vasculitis developing in such patients. Here we describe the case of a 48-year-old post-splenectomy male who developed post-infectious vasculitis following S. pneumoniae [...] Read more.
Intracranial abscesses are rare complications of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, and to our knowledge, there have been no case reports of post-infectious vasculitis developing in such patients. Here we describe the case of a 48-year-old post-splenectomy male who developed post-infectious vasculitis following S. pneumoniae otitis media complicated by mastoiditis, osteomyelitis, meningitis, and intracranial abscess. Clinicians ought to be aware of the possible adverse outcomes of invasive S. pneumoniae and the limitations of current treatment options. Full article
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