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Infectious Disease Reports is published by MDPI from Volume 12 Issue 3 (2020). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.
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Infect. Dis. Rep., Volume 8, Issue 3 (September 2016) – 5 articles

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Case Report
Helicobacter pylori Bacteremia: An Unusual Finding
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(3), 74-75; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6612 - 03 Oct 2016
Viewed by 132
Abstract
We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent [...] Read more.
We report a case of Helicobacter pylori transient bacteremia in a woman with ulcerated antral gastric cancer. The patient was hospitalized for laparoscopy and subtotal gastrectomy. After surgery she developed fever (39°C) and was empirically treated with levofloxacin. Blood cultures, collected and sent immediately to Laboratory, were positive for a spiral Gramnegative bacterium. This isolate was identified as H. pylori and the specific susceptibility test was performed. One day after the fever was decreased but antibiotic treatment with levofloxacin was continued and it was maintained until discharge. In summary, H. pylori transient bacteremia may occur as a rare complication after stomach surgery. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the potential role of H. pylori presence in blood. Full article
Case Report
Aeromonas hydrophila Endocarditis with Ruptured Mycotic Aneurysm of Right Renal Artery
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(3), 71-73; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6515 - 03 Oct 2016
Viewed by 134
Abstract
Aeromonas hydrophila has been infrequently reported as a cause of infection in humans. It has been associated with a variety of clinical syndromes but Aeromonas-related endocarditis is extremely rare. We present the case of a 76- year-old diabetic patient who was admitted [...] Read more.
Aeromonas hydrophila has been infrequently reported as a cause of infection in humans. It has been associated with a variety of clinical syndromes but Aeromonas-related endocarditis is extremely rare. We present the case of a 76- year-old diabetic patient who was admitted to our hospital due to severe lumbar pain resistant to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs accompanied by fever (up to 38.5°C). The vital signs were normal and the physical examination was unremarkable except for tenderness over right flank. Laboratory investigation showed a mild leukocytosis (white blood cell count of 11,360×106/L) with elevation of inflammatory markers. Cardiac ultrasound showed a large vegetation on the mitral valve. Abdominal computed tomogrpahy revealed a ruptured aneurysm of the right renal artery. Multiple sets of blood culture grew A. hydrophila. Full article
Article
Comparing Administrative and Clinical Data for Central Line Associated Blood Stream Infections in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit and Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(3), 58-62; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6275 - 03 Oct 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 124
Abstract
Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a frequent source of health complication for patients of all ages, including for patients in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (PCTU). Many hospitals, including the University of Michigan Health [...] Read more.
Central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are a frequent source of health complication for patients of all ages, including for patients in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and Pediatric Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Unit (PCTU). Many hospitals, including the University of Michigan Health System, currently use the International Classification of Disease (ICD) coding system when coding for CLABSI. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of coding for CLABSI infections with ICD-9CM codes in PICU and PCTU patients. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 75 PICU and PCTU patients with 90 events of hospital acquired central line infections at the University of Michigan Health System (from 2007-2011). The different variables examined in the chart review included the type of central line the patient had, the duration of the stay of the line, the type of organism infecting the patient, and the treatment the patient received. A review was conducted to assess if patients had received the proper ICD-9CM code for their hospital acquired infection. In addition, each patient chart was searched using Electronic Medical Record Search Engine to determine if any phrases that commonly referred to hospital acquired CLABSIs were present in their charts. Our review found that in most CLABSI cases the hospital’s administrative data diagnosis using ICD-9CM coding systems did not code for the CLABSI. Our results indicate a low sensitivity of 32% in the PICU and an even lower sensitivity of 12% in the PCTU. Using these results, we can conclude that the ICD-9CM coding system cannot be used for accurately defining hospital acquired CLABSIs in administrative data. With the new use of the ICD- 10CM coding system, further research is needed to assess the effects of the ICD-10CM coding system on the accuracy of administrative data. Full article
Case Report
Septic Arthritis and Hemarthroses Caused by Haemophilus influenzae Serotype A in Children
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(3), 68-70; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6494 - 29 Sep 2016
Viewed by 116
Abstract
Invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype A (Hia) is rare in children. Clinical syndromes caused by Hia include meningitis, sepsis and respiratory tract infections. Septic arthritis is rare in children with invasive Hia infection and hemarthrosis has not been described in the [...] Read more.
Invasive disease caused by Haemophilus influenzae serotype A (Hia) is rare in children. Clinical syndromes caused by Hia include meningitis, sepsis and respiratory tract infections. Septic arthritis is rare in children with invasive Hia infection and hemarthrosis has not been described in the published literature. We report a case of septic arthritis and hemarthrosis caused by Hia infection in a 2.5 year-old-boy and review invasive Hia infection in children. Full article
Article
Management of Acute Osteomyelitis: A Ten-Year Experience
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2016, 8(3), 63-67; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2016.6350 - 29 Sep 2016
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 119
Abstract
Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone; proper management requires prolonged antibiotic treatment. Controversy exists as to when a patient should transition from intravenous to oral antibiotics. However, due to the high bioavailability of some oral antibiotics, optimal time to transition from high [...] Read more.
Osteomyelitis is an infection of the bone; proper management requires prolonged antibiotic treatment. Controversy exists as to when a patient should transition from intravenous to oral antibiotics. However, due to the high bioavailability of some oral antibiotics, optimal time to transition from high to low bioavailability antibiotics is a more valid consideration. Additionally, there are questions surrounding the efficacy of certain antibiotics, specifically trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), in treating osteomyelitis. After obtaining Institutional Review Board approval from both universities, a retrospective chart review was conducted, utilizing an author-created severity scale, on all patients seen by Pediatric Infectious Diseases at the Universities of Michigan and Toledo with an acute osteomyelitis diagnosis from 2002-2012. There were 133 patients, 106 treated successfully. Success was defined in this study specifically as treatment of <14 weeks without recurrence within 30 days of stopping antibiotics or permanent site disability. Seventeen patients were treated with TMP-SMX at comparable cure rates. Patients with pre-existing bone defects (noted in radiological reports), initial erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) ≥70, hematogenous osteomyelitis with soft tissue extension, and skull osteomyelitis were associated with increased failure rate. Switch to low bioavailability antibiotics occurred, on average, at 3.5 weeks; however, switching before then was not associated with decreased cure rate. As prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), especially clindamycin- resistant MRSA, increases, TMP-SMX appears to be an acceptable antibiotic. There does not appear to be a minimum length of high bioavailability treatment required for cure. Prior bone defect, extensive infection, ESR≥70, or skull osteomyelitis may be indications for more aggressive management. Full article
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