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Volume 11, September
Infectious Disease Reports is published by MDPI from Volume 12 Issue 3 (2020). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.

Infect. Dis. Rep., Volume 11, Issue 3 (December 2019) – 1 article

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Case Report
Capnocytophaga Bacteremia Precipitating Severe Thrombocytopenia and Preterm Labor in an Asplenic Host
Infect. Dis. Rep. 2019, 11(3), 37-40; https://doi.org/10.4081/idr.2019.8272 - 05 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 239
Abstract
Capnocytophaga species are gram-negative bacilli that inhabit mammalian oral surfaces and can cause opportunistic infection, especially in asplenic patients. The species Capnocytophaga canimorsus is particularly associated with dog bites and is known to cause endocarditis, meningitis, and sepsis in the general population. In [...] Read more.
Capnocytophaga species are gram-negative bacilli that inhabit mammalian oral surfaces and can cause opportunistic infection, especially in asplenic patients. The species Capnocytophaga canimorsus is particularly associated with dog bites and is known to cause endocarditis, meningitis, and sepsis in the general population. In pregnant patients, infections tied to Capnocytophaga species from human flora have been associated with preterm labor, chorioamnionitis, and neonatal septicemia. There is little known about the effects of zoonotically-acquired Capnocytophaga infection in pregnant patients. In this case report, we present a patient with Capnocytophaga bacteremia acquired after a dog bite associated with profound thrombocytopenia and preterm labor. Dog bites are common in the United States, and we present basic recommendations for management of dog bites in pregnant patients in order to avoid morbidity associated with delay in time to antibiotic treatment of infection as described in this case. Full article
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