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Article

Design and Development of Liquid Drug Reservoirs for Microneedle Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drug Molecules

School of Pharmacy, Queen’s University, Belfast, 97 Lisburn Road, Belfast BT9 7BL, UK
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Pharmaceutics 2019, 11(11), 605; https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110605
Received: 3 October 2019 / Revised: 1 November 2019 / Accepted: 7 November 2019 / Published: 13 November 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Micro- and Nanofabrication Technologies for Drug Delivery)
The poor aqueous solubility of existing and emerging drugs is a major issue faced by the pharmaceutical industry. Water-miscible organic solvents, termed co-solvents, can be used to enhance the solubility of poorly soluble substances. Typically, drugs with poor aqueous solubility and Log P > 3 are not amenable to delivery across the skin. This study investigated the use of co-solvents as reservoirs to be used in combination with hydrogel-forming microneedles to enhance the transdermal delivery of hydrophobic compounds, namely Nile red, olanzapine and atorvastatin. A custom-made Franz cell apparatus was fabricated to test the suitability of a liquid drug reservoir in combination with polymeric microneedles. A co-solvency approach to reservoir formulation proved effective, with 83.30% ± 9.38% of Nile red dye, dissolved in 1 mL poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG 400), permeating neonatal porcine skin over 24 h. PEG 400 and propylene glycol were found to be suitable reservoir media for olanzapine and atorvastatin, with approximately 50% of each drug delivered after 24 h. This work provides crucial proof-of-concept evidence that the manipulation of microneedle reservoir properties is an effective method to facilitate microneedle-mediated delivery of hydrophobic compounds. View Full-Text
Keywords: poorly soluble; hydrophobic; microneedles; transdermal; Nile red; atorvastatin; olanzapine; Franz cell poorly soluble; hydrophobic; microneedles; transdermal; Nile red; atorvastatin; olanzapine; Franz cell
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kearney, M.-C.; McKenna, P.E.; Quinn, H.L.; Courtenay, A.J.; Larrañeta, E.; Donnelly, R.F. Design and Development of Liquid Drug Reservoirs for Microneedle Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drug Molecules. Pharmaceutics 2019, 11, 605. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110605

AMA Style

Kearney M-C, McKenna PE, Quinn HL, Courtenay AJ, Larrañeta E, Donnelly RF. Design and Development of Liquid Drug Reservoirs for Microneedle Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drug Molecules. Pharmaceutics. 2019; 11(11):605. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110605

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kearney, Mary-Carmel; McKenna, Peter E.; Quinn, Helen L.; Courtenay, Aaron J.; Larrañeta, Eneko; Donnelly, Ryan F. 2019. "Design and Development of Liquid Drug Reservoirs for Microneedle Delivery of Poorly Soluble Drug Molecules" Pharmaceutics 11, no. 11: 605. https://doi.org/10.3390/pharmaceutics11110605

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