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Review

Cannabis and Inflammation in HIV: A Review of Human and Animal Studies

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Departments of Neurosciences and Psychiatry, University of California, San Diego, UCSD HNRC, Mail Code 8231 220 Dickinson Street, Suite B, San Diego, CA 92103, USA
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Department of Community Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, 1700 Owens Street, Suite 316, San Francisco, CA 94158, USA
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Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, 10901 N Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Maria Cecilia Garibaldi Marcondes and Marcus Kaul
Viruses 2021, 13(8), 1521; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13081521
Received: 6 March 2021 / Revised: 24 June 2021 / Accepted: 20 July 2021 / Published: 2 August 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HIV and Drugs of Abuse)
Persistent inflammation occurs in people with HIV (PWH) and has many downstream adverse effects including myocardial infarction, neurocognitive impairment and death. Because the proportion of people with HIV who use cannabis is high and cannabis may be anti-inflammatory, it is important to characterize the impact of cannabis use on inflammation specifically in PWH. We performed a selective, non-exhaustive review of the literature on the effects of cannabis on inflammation in PWH. Research in this area suggests that cannabinoids are anti-inflammatory in the setting of HIV. Anti-inflammatory actions are mediated in many cases through effects on the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in the gut, and through stabilization of gut–blood barrier integrity. Cannabidiol may be particularly important as an anti-inflammatory cannabinoid. Cannabis may provide a beneficial intervention to reduce morbidity related to inflammation in PWH. View Full-Text
Keywords: cannabis; inflammation; HIV; endocannabinoid system; gut microbiota; gut barrier integrity cannabis; inflammation; HIV; endocannabinoid system; gut microbiota; gut barrier integrity
MDPI and ACS Style

Ellis, R.J.; Wilson, N.; Peterson, S. Cannabis and Inflammation in HIV: A Review of Human and Animal Studies. Viruses 2021, 13, 1521. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13081521

AMA Style

Ellis RJ, Wilson N, Peterson S. Cannabis and Inflammation in HIV: A Review of Human and Animal Studies. Viruses. 2021; 13(8):1521. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13081521

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ellis, Ronald J., Natalie Wilson, and Scott Peterson. 2021. "Cannabis and Inflammation in HIV: A Review of Human and Animal Studies" Viruses 13, no. 8: 1521. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13081521

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