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Review

The Advantages and Challenges of Using Endolysins in a Clinical Setting

1
School of Microbiology, University College Cork, T12 YT20 Cork, Ireland
2
APC Microbiome Ireland, University College Cork, T12 YT20 Cork, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Joana Azeredo and Sílvio Santos
Viruses 2021, 13(4), 680; https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040680
Received: 15 March 2021 / Revised: 9 April 2021 / Accepted: 13 April 2021 / Published: 15 April 2021
Antibiotic-resistant pathogens are increasingly more prevalent and problematic. Traditional antibiotics are no longer a viable option for dealing with these multidrug-resistant microbes and so new approaches are needed. Bacteriophage-derived proteins such as endolysins could offer one effective solution. Endolysins are bacteriophage-encoded peptidoglycan hydrolases that act to lyse bacterial cells by targeting their cell’s wall, particularly in Gram-positive bacteria due to their naturally exposed peptidoglycan layer. These lytic enzymes have received much interest from the scientific community in recent years for their specificity, mode of action, potential for engineering, and lack of resistance mechanisms. Over the past decade, a renewed interest in endolysin therapy has led to a number of successful applications. Recombinant endolysins have been shown to be effective against prominent pathogens such as MRSA, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus strains in biofilm formation, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Endolysins have also been studied in combination with other antimicrobials, giving a synergistic effect. Although endolysin therapy comes with some regulatory and logistical hurdles, the future looks promising, with the emergence of engineered “next-generation” lysins. This review will focus on the likelihood that endolysins will become a viable new antimicrobial therapy and the challenges that may have to be overcome along the way. View Full-Text
Keywords: endolysin; bacteriophage; antibiotics; multidrug resistance; novel therapy endolysin; bacteriophage; antibiotics; multidrug resistance; novel therapy
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MDPI and ACS Style

Murray, E.; Draper, L.A.; Ross, R.P.; Hill, C. The Advantages and Challenges of Using Endolysins in a Clinical Setting. Viruses 2021, 13, 680. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040680

AMA Style

Murray E, Draper LA, Ross RP, Hill C. The Advantages and Challenges of Using Endolysins in a Clinical Setting. Viruses. 2021; 13(4):680. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040680

Chicago/Turabian Style

Murray, Ellen, Lorraine A. Draper, R. P. Ross, and Colin Hill. 2021. "The Advantages and Challenges of Using Endolysins in a Clinical Setting" Viruses 13, no. 4: 680. https://doi.org/10.3390/v13040680

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