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Open AccessArticle

Parechovirus A Detection by a Comprehensive Approach in a Clinical Laboratory

1
Department of Microbiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung81362, Taiwan
2
Department of Pediatrics, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung 81362, Taiwan
3
Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan
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Department of Medical Research, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan
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Department of Infectious Diseases, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung 81362, Taiwan
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Department of Medical Education and Research, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung 81362, Taiwan
7
Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, Chung Hwa University of Medical Technology, Tainan 717, Taiwan
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Viruses 2018, 10(12), 711; https://doi.org/10.3390/v10120711
Received: 7 November 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 12 December 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Viruses)
Parechovirus A (Human parechovirus, HPeV) causes symptoms ranging from severe neonatal infection to mild gastrointestinal and respiratory disease. Use of molecular approaches with RT-PCR and genotyping has improved the detection rate of HPeV. Conventional methods, such as viral culture and immunofluorescence assay, together with molecular methods facilitate comprehensive viral diagnosis. To establish the HPeV immunofluorescence assay, an antibody against HPeV capsid protein VP0 was generated by using antigenic epitope prediction data. The specificity of the anti-HPeV VP0 antibody was demonstrated on immunofluorescence assay, showing that this antibody was specific for HPeV but not enteroviruses. A total of 74 HPeV isolates, 7 non–polio-enteroviruses and 12 HPeV negative cell culture supernatant were used for evaluating the efficiency of the anti-HPeV VP0 antibody. The sensitivity of HPeV detection by the anti-HPeV VP0 antibody was consistent with 5′untranslated region (UTR) RT-PCR analysis. This study established comprehensive methods for HPeV detection that include viral culture and observation of cytopathic effect, immunofluorescence assay, RT-PCR and genotyping. The methods were incorporated into our routine clinical practice for viral diagnosis. In conclusion, this study established a protocol for enterovirus and HPeV virus identification that combines conventional and molecular methods and would be beneficial for HPeV diagnosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: human parechovirus; immunofluorescence assay; virus diagnosis; clinical laboratory; emerging virus human parechovirus; immunofluorescence assay; virus diagnosis; clinical laboratory; emerging virus
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MDPI and ACS Style

Chen, B.-C.; Chang, J.-T.; Huang, T.-S.; Chen, J.-J.; Chen, Y.-S.; Jan, M.-W.; Chang, T.-H. Parechovirus A Detection by a Comprehensive Approach in a Clinical Laboratory. Viruses 2018, 10, 711.

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