Next Article in Journal
Can Strict Protection Stop the Decline of Mangrove Ecosystems in China? From Rapid Destruction to Rampant Degradation
Previous Article in Journal
Effects of Metaxenia on Stone Cell Formation in Pear (Pyrus bretschneideri) Based on Transcriptomic Analysis and Functional Characterization of the Lignin-Related Gene PbC4H2
Open AccessArticle

Temporal Effects of Thinning on the Leaf C:N:P Stoichiometry of Regenerated Broadleaved Trees in Larch Plantations

by Jin Xie 1,2,3, Qiaoling Yan 1,2,*, Junfeng Yuan 1,2,3, Rong Li 1,2,3, Xiaotao Lü 1, Shengli Liu 4 and Jiaojun Zhu 1,2
1
CAS Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Management, Institute of Applied Ecology, Shenyang 110016, China
2
Qingyuan Forest CERN, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, China
3
University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049, China
4
Natural Resources Bureau of Qingyuan Manchu Autonomous County, Qingyuan Manchu Autonomous County, Fushun 113300, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2020, 11(1), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11010054
Received: 25 November 2019 / Revised: 18 December 2019 / Accepted: 23 December 2019 / Published: 1 January 2020
(This article belongs to the Section Forest Ecology and Management)
The shift from natural mixed broadleaved forests to pure coniferous plantations results in soil degradation and the unsustainable development of plantations due to the simple stand structure and low species diversity. Thinning can practically sustain the forest structure and promote the regeneration and growth of broadleaved trees in these pure coniferous plantations. The growth of regenerated broadleaved trees is closely related to leaf ecological stoichiometry, which is strongly restricted by environmental factors such as light, soil moisture, and nutrients after thinning. However, the temporal effects of thinning on leaf C:N:P stoichiometry are still not well understood, which constrains our understanding of implementing thinning in coniferous plantations to promote the regeneration and growth of broadleaved species, and further forming the mixed larch-broadleaf forests. Here, we compared canopy openness (i.e., light availability) and the soil and leaf stoichiometry for regenerated broadleaved trees in larch (Larix keampferi) plantations in short-term (1–3 years), medium-term (4–9 years), and long-term (≥10 years) periods after thinning, taking natural mixed broadleaved forests as a control in Northeast China. The results showed that the temporal effects of thinning were not significant with respect to soil C concentrations, but significant with respect to soil C:P and N:P ratios. The regenerated broadleaved trees adjusted their leaf N concentrations and C:N ratios in response to the changed environmental conditions after thinning over time. The responses of soil and leaf stoichiometry to thinning and their significant correlation indicated a strong interaction between the soil and understory regeneration following thinning. Thus, thinning affects the soil and leaf stoichiometry of regenerated trees over time. These findings provide new insights into the conversion of pure coniferous plantations into mixed larch-broadleaf forests by controlling thinning intervals. View Full-Text
Keywords: light availability; soil nutrient; understory; shade tolerance; Larix spp. light availability; soil nutrient; understory; shade tolerance; Larix spp.
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Xie, J.; Yan, Q.; Yuan, J.; Li, R.; Lü, X.; Liu, S.; Zhu, J. Temporal Effects of Thinning on the Leaf C:N:P Stoichiometry of Regenerated Broadleaved Trees in Larch Plantations. Forests 2020, 11, 54.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop