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Effect of Deadwood on Ectomycorrhizal Colonisation of Old-Growth Oak Forests

1
Department of Plant Pathology, Faculty of Horticulture, Biotechnology and Landscape Architecture, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
2
Department of Forest Ecology, Forest Research Institute, Braci Leśnej 3, Sękocin Stary, 05-090 Raszyn, Poland
3
Department of Experimental Design and Bioinformatics, Faculty of Agriculture and Biology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland
4
Department of Molecular and Biometric Techniques, Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Science, Wilcza 64, 00-679 Warsaw, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Forests 2019, 10(6), 480; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10060480
Received: 30 April 2019 / Revised: 29 May 2019 / Accepted: 30 May 2019 / Published: 31 May 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Biodiversity under the Changing Land Use and Climate)
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Abstract

Although the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) for species diversity is recognized, the effects of coarse woody debris decay class on species composition have received little attention. We examined how the species composition of ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) changes with CWD decay. We describe ectomycorrhizal root tips and the diversity of mycorrhizal fungal species at three English oak (Quercus robur L.) sites. DNA barcoding revealed a total of 17 ECM fungal species. The highest degree of mycorrhizal colonization was found in CWDadvanced (27.2%) and CWDearly (27.1%). Based on exploration types, ectomycorrhizae were classified with respect to ecologically relevant soil features. The short distance type was significantly correlated with soil P2O5, while the contact type was correlated with soil C/N. The lowest mean content of soil Corg was found in the CWDabsent site. The difference in total soil N between sites decreased with increasing CWD decomposition, whereas total C/N increased correspondingly. In this study we confirmed that soil CWD stimulates ectomycorrhizal fungi, representing contact or short-distance exploration types of mycelium. View Full-Text
Keywords: Białowieża; coarse woody debris; Quercus robur; ectomycorrhizae; exploration type Białowieża; coarse woody debris; Quercus robur; ectomycorrhizae; exploration type
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Olchowik, J.; Hilszczańska, D.; Bzdyk, R.M.; Studnicki, M.; Malewski, T.; Borowski, Z. Effect of Deadwood on Ectomycorrhizal Colonisation of Old-Growth Oak Forests. Forests 2019, 10, 480.

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