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Special Issue "Forest Biodiversity under the Changing Land Use and Climate"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jakub Horák

Czech Univ Life Sci Prague, Fac Forestry & Wood Sci, Kamycka 129, CZ-16500 Prague 6, Suchdol, Czech Republic
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Biodiversity; Conservation Biology; Ecology and Evolution; Conservation; Ecology; Ecosystem Ecology; Species Diversity; Wildlife Conservation; Invasive Species; Biodiversity Monitoring

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests are dramatically changing all over the world. This change is dynamic and irreversible. Therefore, there is a high probability that the forests we see now will be completely different for our descendants.
Human beings are presently the most important factor (at least one of factors) that drives the conspicuous changes of the forests on Earth. One of the most important factors of the ongoing changes to forest environment (e.g., spatial structure, dominant tree-species survival, or interconnection with other ecosystems) is the global change of climate and land use. It is presumed that these changes are much more intensive than they have been in the past after the last Glaciation. Hence, global changes have a strong impact on the actual biological diversity of forests.
Forests are most probably the most biodiverse ecosystems on our planet. Mainly, the presence of biomass from trees and its combination with specific climate and soil conditions appear to be important factors that make forests places of high species numbers, often with a presence of unique biota. Many studies in the past evaluated the effect of changing forest environments on individual taxa (e.g., birds, fungi, or beetles). More recently, several authors have been trying to compare the effects of diverse forest conditions from the multi-taxa point of view. Both approaches, together with the evaluation of the environment, are important when it comes to the knowledge of forest biodiversity.
This Special Issue should bring one important piece of knowledge to the mosaic of forest biodiversity—a point of view of different scientists from different countries with different specializations to the groups of biota and evaluation of environment. This could be a synthesis of an important document of our present for future generations.

Dr. Jakub Horák
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest management
  • biodiversity conservation
  • forest ecology
  • species richness
  • forest loss
  • disturbance regimes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Diversity and Genetic Structure Inferred with Microsatellites in Natural Populations of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco (Pinaceae) in the Central Region of Mexico
Forests 2019, 10(2), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020101
Received: 23 October 2018 / Revised: 21 December 2018 / Accepted: 31 December 2018 / Published: 28 January 2019
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Abstract
The amount and structure of the genetic diversity in Mexican populations of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, is almost unknown, since most genetic studies have been carried out on populations from Canada and the United States. Here, we applied a set of 12 microsatellite [...] Read more.
The amount and structure of the genetic diversity in Mexican populations of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, is almost unknown, since most genetic studies have been carried out on populations from Canada and the United States. Here, we applied a set of 12 microsatellite markers to 12 populations (234 trees) from the central region of Mexico in order to determine values of genetic diversity and differentiation. Seventy-three different alleles were identified: an average number of alleles per locus (Na) of 6.083, effective number of alleles (Ne) of 2.039, observed heterozygosity (Ho) of 0.229, and expected heterozygosity (Ht) of 0.417. Genetic differentiation was high: the coefficient of differentiation (θ) was 0.270, while the coefficient of structure (Φst) was 0.278. Bayesian analysis identified two genetic groups in central Mexico. The PCoA and the dendrogram were in concordance with the two genetic groups. The results of the analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) indicate that genetic variation exists mainly within populations (72.149%). Therefore, conservation efforts should focus on as many individuals within populations as possible, to maintain this variation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Biodiversity under the Changing Land Use and Climate)
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Open AccessArticle Ectomycorrhizal Colonisation in Declining Oak Stands on the Krotoszyn Plateau, Poland
Forests 2019, 10(1), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010030
Received: 5 December 2018 / Revised: 22 December 2018 / Accepted: 31 December 2018 / Published: 4 January 2019
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Abstract
We describe the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root tips and the diversity of mycorrhizal fungal species at three English oak (Quercus robur) sites (two 120 year old sites and one 60 year old site). The three oak stands in decline, located in western [...] Read more.
We describe the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) root tips and the diversity of mycorrhizal fungal species at three English oak (Quercus robur) sites (two 120 year old sites and one 60 year old site). The three oak stands in decline, located in western Poland, were characterized by a low degree of vital ECM colonization: 30.2%, 29.1% and 25.6% at Krotoszyn (K), Piaski (P) and Karczma Borowa (KB), respectively. DNA (ITS) barcoding revealed a total of 18 ECM fungal species. Based on exploration types, ectomycorrhizae were classified with respect to ecologically relevant features. The contact type was significantly correlated with C:N and Corg, while the short distance type was correlated with Ca, phosphorus (P2O5) and pH. The medium distance exploration type was significantly correlated with fine-grained soil particle size fractions: coarse silt (0.05–0.02 mm) and fine silt (0.02–0.002 mm), and clay (<0.002 mm). The long distance type showed a similar pattern to the medium distance smooth type, but was also correlated with nitrate (N). The values of biometric root parameters of oak trees at the analysed forest sites were arranged as follows: K > P > KB, and were opposite to the condition of the tree crowns. A negative correlation of vital ECM root tip abundance with the crown health status of oaks was observed, whereas higher ECM diversity reflected better crown health in the oak stands studied. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Forest Biodiversity under the Changing Land Use and Climate)
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