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Article

The COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis and Patient Safety Culture: A Mixed-Method Study

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Department of Social Medicine and Organization of Health Care, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
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Department of Environmental and Occupational Health and Sports Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
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School of Medicine, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(4), 2237; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042237
Received: 5 December 2021 / Revised: 5 February 2022 / Accepted: 12 February 2022 / Published: 16 February 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Safety Culture in Hospitals)
The COVID-19 pandemic has put inordinate pressure on frontline healthcare workers (HCWs) and hospitals. HCWs are under chronic emotional stress, affected by burnout, moral distress and interpersonal issues with peers or supervisors during the pandemic. All of these can lead to lower levels of patient safety. The goal of this study was to examine patient safety culture values in a COVID-19 frontline hospital. Patient safety represents action, while patient safety culture represents the beliefs, values and norms of an organization that support and promote patient safety. Patient safety culture is a prerequisite for patient safety. A cross-sectional study on healthcare workers (228, response rate of 81.43%) at a COVID-19 frontline hospital was conducted using the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HOSPSC), which had PSC dimensions, single question dimensions and comments. Our research revealed that, during the COVID-19 pandemic, a number of patient safety issues have been identified: low communication openness and current punitive response to errors, which might have incapacitated HCWs in the reporting of adverse events. Although participants expressed high supervisor/management expectations, actual support from the supervisor/management tier was low. Poor teamwork across units was identified as another issue, as well as low staffing. The infrastructure was identified as a potential new PSC dimension. There was a lack of support from supervisors/managers, while HCWs need their supervisors to be available; to be visible on the front line and to create an environment of trust, psychological safety and empowerment. View Full-Text
Keywords: patient safety culture; healthcare workers; COVID-19 pandemic; hospital; healthcare safety; healthcare professional safety patient safety culture; healthcare workers; COVID-19 pandemic; hospital; healthcare safety; healthcare professional safety
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MDPI and ACS Style

Brborović, O.; Brborović, H.; Hrain, L. The COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis and Patient Safety Culture: A Mixed-Method Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19, 2237. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042237

AMA Style

Brborović O, Brborović H, Hrain L. The COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis and Patient Safety Culture: A Mixed-Method Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2022; 19(4):2237. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042237

Chicago/Turabian Style

Brborović, Ognjen, Hana Brborović, and Leonarda Hrain. 2022. "The COVID-19 Pandemic Crisis and Patient Safety Culture: A Mixed-Method Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 19, no. 4: 2237. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19042237

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