Special Issue "Patient Safety Culture in Hospitals"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Joann Sorra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Behavioral Health and Health Policy, Center for Healthcare Delivery Research and Evaluation at Westat in Rockville, MD 20850, USA
Interests: health services research; patient safety and patient safety culture; patient experience with healthcare; health care quality; organizational culture; implementation science; program evaluation; survey research and methodology
Prof. Dr. Cordula Wagner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Netherlands Institute of Health Services Research (NIVEL), 3513 CR Utrecht, Netherlands; VU University/Amsterdam University Medical Center, 1081 HV Amsterdam, Netherlands
Interests: quality improvement; patient safety; health services research; safety culture and resilience; health care process evaluation; implementation science; health care systems and governance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on hospital patient safety culture under the section of Health Care Sciences & Services in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is an open-access, peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of health sciences and public health. For detailed information about the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

Healthcare delivery in hospitals around the world has changed dramatically since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in late 2019/early 2020. Health systems have had to quickly adapt to this crisis by developing new ways to deliver care to patients while maintaining the safety of healthcare professionals. This Special Issue invites recent research that focuses on patient safety culture and organizational culture in hospitals. Research conducted before the COVID-19 pandemic should include reflection on the impact of the findings in light of the current situation at the time of submission. We are interested in capturing insights and lessons learned during this unprecedented time in healthcare delivery, as well as comparisons to the time before the crisis. Potential areas of interest, among others, include hospital-based research focused on:

  • The adaption and/or implementation of processes, practices or initiatives before or during the pandemic that affect hospital patient safety culture/organizational culture and/or quality of care;
  • Whether system adaptations will only be effective during a pandemic or could result in lasting benefits to patient care;
  • Understanding and interpreting hospital patient safety culture/organizational culture during a pandemic compared to a non-pandemic time;
  • Relationships between hospital patient safety culture/organizational culture and healthcare professional safety and wellbeing;
  • How hospital leadership response to the pandemic affects patient safety culture/organizational culture;
  • Resilience in crisis situations and its relationship to quality of care and hospital patient safety culture/organizational culture;
  • Patient experience of care in crisis situations related to hospital patient safety culture/organizational culture;
  • Innovation and creativity in crisis situations related to hospital patient safety culture/organizational culture;
  • Teamwork and communication within hospitals during the pandemic.

This Special Issue of IJERPH, entitled “Hospital Patient Safety Culture” welcomes the submission of research involving quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods, as well as practice-oriented research or reviews of relevant scientific literature.

Dr. Joann Sorra
Prof. Dr. Cordula Wagner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Hospital
  • Patient safety culture
  • Organizational culture
  • Healthcare delivery
  • Healthcare quality
  • Healthcare safety
  • Workplace/workforce/healthcare professional safety
  • COVID-19 pandemic
  • Resilience
  • Healthcare professional burnout/stress
  • Healthcare management

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Using Dominance Analysis to Identify the Most Important Dimensions of Safety Culture for Predicting Patient Safety
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 7746; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157746 - 21 Jul 2021
Viewed by 284
Abstract
Studies have demonstrated associations between safety culture and patient safety based on the perceptions of healthcare professionals, but limited attention has been given to the perceptions of nurses. Moreover, most studies have used regression modeling, an approach that limits researchers’ ability to identify [...] Read more.
Studies have demonstrated associations between safety culture and patient safety based on the perceptions of healthcare professionals, but limited attention has been given to the perceptions of nurses. Moreover, most studies have used regression modeling, an approach that limits researchers’ ability to identify the most important predictors of patient safety due to intercorrelations among predictors in the model. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of seven dimensions of safety culture on nurse-rated patient safety and identify the relative importance of these dimensions for predicting patient safety. This correlational study used data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s 2018 Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. Data from 13,031 nurses working in surgical areas of 443 hospitals in the United States were examined using logistic regression and dominance analysis. Staffing adequacy was the strongest predictor of patient safety, followed by hospital management support for patient safety and organizational learning/continuous improvement. However, dominance analysis showed that hospital management support for patient safety was the most important predictor rather than staffing adequacy. Nurse managers and hospital administrators should role model a culture of safety and demonstrate their valuing of patient safety by providing sufficient resources, listening to and valuing staff suggestions regarding patient safety, and providing feedback about organizational changes to improve patient safety. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Safety Culture in Hospitals)
Article
The Organizational Atmosphere in Israeli Hospital during COVID-19: Concerns, Perceptions, and Burnout
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(11), 5544; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18115544 - 22 May 2021
Viewed by 532
Abstract
The COVID-19 crisis poses challenges to healthcare systems and requires micro- and macro-organizational adaptations. This study examined the organizational atmosphere in Israeli hospitals by evaluating workers’ perceptions and concerns about the COVID-19 crisis and its management. At the end of the pandemic’s first [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 crisis poses challenges to healthcare systems and requires micro- and macro-organizational adaptations. This study examined the organizational atmosphere in Israeli hospitals by evaluating workers’ perceptions and concerns about the COVID-19 crisis and its management. At the end of the pandemic’s first wave in Israel, 547 healthcare workers responded to an online survey, which inquired about COVID-19 concerns at the individual and family level, perceptions at the national and organizational level, perceptions of the way the crisis was managed, self-assessment of coping with the crisis and burnout, and demographics. Findings showed that healthcare workers expressed deep concerns for family members and apprehension at a national level. Respondents noted that they were coping well with the crisis while expressing negative perceptions of how the crisis was managed. A regression model showed that the low self-assessment of medical staff of coping with the crisis, deep concerns at the organizational level, negative perceptions of crisis management, and providing care for COVID-19 patients were predictors of burnout. The findings emphasize the importance of developing a supportive organizational culture for hospital workers. Awareness of their concerns and perceptions is essential to improve organizational culture and healthcare systems’ ability to continue fighting the virus and confront future health crises. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Safety Culture in Hospitals)
Article
Perceptions of Patient Safety Culture and Medication Error Reporting among Early- and Mid-Career Female Nurses in South Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4853; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094853 - 01 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 743
Abstract
Reporting medication errors is crucial for improving quality of care and patient safety in acute care settings. To date, little is known about how reporting varies between early and mid-career nurses. Thus, this study used a cross-sectional, secondary data analysis design to investigate [...] Read more.
Reporting medication errors is crucial for improving quality of care and patient safety in acute care settings. To date, little is known about how reporting varies between early and mid-career nurses. Thus, this study used a cross-sectional, secondary data analysis design to investigate the differences between early (under the age of 35) and mid-career (ages 35–54) female nurses by examining their perceptions of patient safety culture using the Korean Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSPSC) and single-item self-report measure of medication error reporting. A total of 311 hospital nurses (260 early-career and 51 mid-career nurses) completed questionnaires on perceived patient safety culture and medication error reporting. Early-career nurses had lower levels of perception regarding patient safety culture (p = 0.034) compared to mid-career nurses. A multiple logistic regression analysis showed that relatively short clinical experience (<3 years) and a higher level of perceived patient safety culture increased the rate of appropriate medication error reporting among early-career nurses. However, there was no significant association between perception of patient safety culture and medication error reporting among mid-career nurses. Future studies should investigate the role of positive perception of patient safety culture on reporting errors considering multidimensional aspects, and include hospital contextual factors among early-, mid-, and late-career nurses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Patient Safety Culture in Hospitals)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Organizational Atmosphere in Israeli Hospital during COVID-19: Concerns, Perceptions, and Burnout
Authors: Bashkin Osnat 1, *, Davidovitch Nadav 2, Asna Noam3, Schwartz Doron4, and Dopelt Keren 1, 2
Affiliation: 1 Department of Public Health, Ashkelon Academic College, Israel, [email protected]; 2 Department of Health Systems Management, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, [email protected], [email protected]; 3 Oncology Institute, Ziv Medical Center, Israel, [email protected]; 4 Institute of Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel, [email protected]
Abstract: The COVID-19 has become one of the most severe health crises in recent decades. In Israel, over 480,000 people have been infected with the virus up to date. The pandemic presents challenges for healthcare systems, affecting medical teams on the frontlines of the fight against it. The current study examined Israeli healthcare workers' perceptions and concerns with the coronavirus crisis and its management. 547 healthcare workers from a large university medical center in Israel responded to an electronic survey carried out at the end of the first phase of the pandemic in Israel (May 2020). The survey included demographics, concerns with COVID-19 at individual and family levels, perceptions at the national and systemic level, attitudes towards the crisis management, self-assessment of coping with the crisis and burnout. Healthcare workers expressed high rates of concerns for family members and apprehensions at a national level (for example, worries with economic crisis accompanied to the pandemic and increased spread of the virus). Respondents noted that they are coping well with the crisis while expressing negative perceptions towards the crisis management at the national level. Regression model showed that concerns for family members, perceptions at the system level, working directly with COVID-19 patients, and having negative perceptions towards the crisis management at the national level, were associated with burnout. The findings emphasize the importance of a continuous examination of medical staff concerns and needs during the pandemic and its effect on burnout. Examining perceptions of medical staff who are dealing with the pandemic is essential to improve organizational culture and healthcare systems' readiness to continue fighting the virus and confronting future health crises.

Title: The Perceptions of Patient Safety Culture and Medication Error Reporting Among Early-and Mid-Career Female Nurses in South Korea
Authors: Sun Joo Jang; Haeyoung Lee; Youn-Jung Son *
Affiliation: Red Cross College of Nursing, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974
Abstract: Reporting medication errors is crucial to quality improvement and patient safety in acute care settings. A positive safety culture can promote reporting rate of medication errors. To date, little is known about this topic in early career nurses and how it varies between early and mid-career nurses. Thus, this study aimed to comapre the perceptions of patient safety culture and medication error reproting and identify their association between early (under the age of 35) and mid-career (ages 35-54) female nurses. This study used a cross-sectional, secondary data analysis design. A total of 311 hospital nurses (260 early career and 51 mid-career nures) completed the questionnaires including the validated tool on perceived patient safety culture and medication error reporting. Early career nureses had a lower level of perception on patient safety culture (p=0.034) and a relatively low reporting rate of medication error (p=0.320) compared to mid-career nurses. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that longer clinical experience with more than 3 years and higher level of perceived patient safety culture increased the reporting rate of medication error reporting among early career nurses. However, perception of patient safety culture was not significantly associated with medication error reporting among mid-career nurses. Future studies should further investigate the role of positive perception on patient safety culture on reporting errors considering multidimensional aspects including hospital contextual factors among early, mid, and late career nurses.

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