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Global Population Exposed to Extreme Events in the 150 Most Populated Cities of the World: Implications for Public Health

1
Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD 20742, USA
2
School of Remote Sensing and Information Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079, China
3
Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 1293; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031293
Received: 23 December 2020 / Revised: 25 January 2021 / Accepted: 27 January 2021 / Published: 1 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Climate Change)
Climate change driven increases in the frequency of extreme heat events (EHE) and extreme precipitation events (EPE) are contributing to both infectious and non-infectious disease burden, particularly in urban city centers. While the share of urban populations continues to grow, a comprehensive assessment of populations impacted by these threats is lacking. Using data from weather stations, climate models, and urban population growth during 1980–2017, here, we show that the concurrent rise in the frequency of EHE, EPE, and urban populations has resulted in over 500% increases in individuals exposed to EHE and EPE in the 150 most populated cities of the world. Since most of the population increases over the next several decades are projected to take place in city centers within low- and middle-income countries, skillful early warnings and community specific response strategies are urgently needed to minimize public health impacts and associated costs to the global economy. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; extreme heat event; extreme precipitation event; megacities; urban area; urban heat island effect; global population climate change; extreme heat event; extreme precipitation event; megacities; urban area; urban heat island effect; global population
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MDPI and ACS Style

Li, L.; Jiang, C.; Murtugudde, R.; Liang, X.-Z.; Sapkota, A. Global Population Exposed to Extreme Events in the 150 Most Populated Cities of the World: Implications for Public Health. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 1293. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031293

AMA Style

Li L, Jiang C, Murtugudde R, Liang X-Z, Sapkota A. Global Population Exposed to Extreme Events in the 150 Most Populated Cities of the World: Implications for Public Health. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(3):1293. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031293

Chicago/Turabian Style

Li, Linze, Chengsheng Jiang, Raghu Murtugudde, Xin-Zhong Liang, and Amir Sapkota. 2021. "Global Population Exposed to Extreme Events in the 150 Most Populated Cities of the World: Implications for Public Health" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 3: 1293. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18031293

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