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Gender and Childhood Victimization: A Longitudinal Study of Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood

1
Department of Justice Studies, Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, TX 77446, USA
2
PERSEREC, Peraton, Seaside, CA 93955, USA
3
Center for Depression Research and Clinical Care, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390, USA
4
School of Social Work, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35401, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11089; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111089
Received: 15 September 2021 / Revised: 10 October 2021 / Accepted: 12 October 2021 / Published: 21 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disparities in Health-Risk Behaviors and Health)
The present longitudinal study, for 12 years, followed a group of young adults, examining (1) whether/how victimization in childhood increased the likelihood of heavy drinking; (2) whether depression mediated the strain–heavy drinking relationship; and (3) whether/how relationships among strain, depression, and heavy drinking differed across two gender groups. Data came from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort, dating 2004–2015 (5 interview waves and 22,549 person-wave measurements total). We linked consumption of 5+ drinks (during the month prior) to four discrete measures of violent victimization, to one measure of stressful events, and to depression. We needed to consider repeat measures of the same variables over time, so we used generalized estimating equations (GEE) to analyze data. Depression was found to increase heavy drinking uniformly. Empirical evidence confirmed that in the strain–heavy drinking relationship, depression plays a minor mediating role. Gender moderated heavy drinking’s associations. Specifically, bullying in childhood raised risk for female respondents. The current strain was associated with a higher risk of heavy drinking among male respondents. Childhood victimization, as well as current life stress, play an important role in depression and heavy drinking. Future research should focus on the development of specific, targeted care to reduce heavy drinking’s harm and promote equity among Americans. View Full-Text
Keywords: heavy drinking; victimization in childhood; depression; longitudinal study; gender heavy drinking; victimization in childhood; depression; longitudinal study; gender
MDPI and ACS Style

Ash-Houchen, W.; Lo, C.C.; Gerling, H.M.; Cheng, T.C. Gender and Childhood Victimization: A Longitudinal Study of Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 11089. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111089

AMA Style

Ash-Houchen W, Lo CC, Gerling HM, Cheng TC. Gender and Childhood Victimization: A Longitudinal Study of Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(21):11089. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111089

Chicago/Turabian Style

Ash-Houchen, William, Celia C. Lo, Heather M. Gerling, and Tyrone C. Cheng 2021. "Gender and Childhood Victimization: A Longitudinal Study of Heavy Drinking in Young Adulthood" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 21: 11089. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111089

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