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Review

Bioprinting Technology in Skin, Heart, Pancreas and Cartilage Tissues: Progress and Challenges in Clinical Practice

1
Multifactorial and Complex Disease Research Area, Preventive and Predictive Medicine Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, 00146 Rome, Italy
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Engineering Department, Niccolò Cusano University of Rome, INSTM RU, 00166 Rome, Italy
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Genetics and Rare Diseases Research Area, Bone Physiopathology Research Unit, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, 00146 Rome, Italy
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Clinical Management and Technological Innovations Area, Department of Imaging, Bambino Gesù Children’s Hospital, IRCCS, 00146 Rome, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Xiubo Zhao
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(20), 10806; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010806
Received: 3 September 2021 / Revised: 29 September 2021 / Accepted: 8 October 2021 / Published: 14 October 2021
Bioprinting is an emerging additive manufacturing technique which shows an outstanding potential for shaping customized functional substitutes for tissue engineering. Its introduction into the clinical space in order to replace injured organs could ideally overcome the limitations faced with allografts. Presently, even though there have been years of prolific research in the field, there is a wide gap to bridge in order to bring bioprinting from “bench to bedside”. This is due to the fact that bioprinted designs have not yet reached the complexity required for clinical use, nor have clear GMP (good manufacturing practices) rules or precise regulatory guidelines been established. This review provides an overview of some of the most recent and remarkable achievements for skin, heart, pancreas and cartilage bioprinting breakthroughs while highlighting the critical shortcomings for each tissue type which is keeping this technique from becoming widespread reality. View Full-Text
Keywords: bioprinting; skin; heart; pancreas; cartilage; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; clinical applications bioprinting; skin; heart; pancreas; cartilage; tissue engineering; regenerative medicine; clinical applications
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MDPI and ACS Style

Di Piazza, E.; Pandolfi, E.; Cacciotti, I.; Del Fattore, A.; Tozzi, A.E.; Secinaro, A.; Borro, L. Bioprinting Technology in Skin, Heart, Pancreas and Cartilage Tissues: Progress and Challenges in Clinical Practice. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 10806. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010806

AMA Style

Di Piazza E, Pandolfi E, Cacciotti I, Del Fattore A, Tozzi AE, Secinaro A, Borro L. Bioprinting Technology in Skin, Heart, Pancreas and Cartilage Tissues: Progress and Challenges in Clinical Practice. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(20):10806. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010806

Chicago/Turabian Style

Di Piazza, Eleonora, Elisabetta Pandolfi, Ilaria Cacciotti, Andrea Del Fattore, Alberto E. Tozzi, Aurelio Secinaro, and Luca Borro. 2021. "Bioprinting Technology in Skin, Heart, Pancreas and Cartilage Tissues: Progress and Challenges in Clinical Practice" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 20: 10806. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182010806

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