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Article

Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain Medication, and in-Hospital Mortality among Patients with COVID-19 in South Korea: A Population-Based Cohort Study

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Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 13620, Korea
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Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, National Cancer Center, Goyang 10408, Korea
3
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul 03080, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Paul B. Tchounwou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6804; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136804
Received: 30 April 2021 / Revised: 8 June 2021 / Accepted: 23 June 2021 / Published: 24 June 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19: Prognosis, Outcomes and Long-Term Sequelae)
We aimed to investigate whether comorbid musculoskeletal disorders (MSD)s and pain medication use was associated with in-hospital mortality among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Adult patients (≥20 years old) with a positive COVID-19 diagnosis until 5 June 2020 were included in this study, based on the National Health Insurance COVID-19 database in South Korea. MSDs included osteoarthritis, neck pain, lower back pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and others, while pain medication included paracetamol, gabapentin, pregabalin, glucocorticoid, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), opioids (strong and weak opioids), and benzodiazepine. Primary endpoint was in-hospital mortality. A total of 7713 patients with COVID-19 were included, and in-hospital mortality was observed in 248 (3.2%) patients. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, no MSDs (p > 0.05) were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. However, in-hospital mortality was 12.73 times higher in users of strong opioids (odds ratio: 12.73, 95% confidence interval: 2.44–16.64; p = 0.002), while use of paracetamol (p = 0.973), gabapentin or pregabalin (p = 0.424), glucocorticoid (p = 0.673), NSAIDs (p = 0.979), weak opioids (p = 0.876), and benzodiazepine (p = 0.324) was not associated with in-hospital mortality. In South Korea, underlying MSDs were not associated with increased in-hospital mortality among patients with COVID-19. However, use of strong opioids was significantly associated with increased in-hospital mortality among the patients. View Full-Text
Keywords: analgesics; opioid; musculoskeletal diseases; pain; population analgesics; opioid; musculoskeletal diseases; pain; population
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MDPI and ACS Style

Oh, T.-K.; Song, I.-A.; Lee, J.; Eom, W.; Jeon, Y.-T. Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain Medication, and in-Hospital Mortality among Patients with COVID-19 in South Korea: A Population-Based Cohort Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 6804. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136804

AMA Style

Oh T-K, Song I-A, Lee J, Eom W, Jeon Y-T. Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain Medication, and in-Hospital Mortality among Patients with COVID-19 in South Korea: A Population-Based Cohort Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2021; 18(13):6804. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136804

Chicago/Turabian Style

Oh, Tak-Kyu, In-Ae Song, Joon Lee, Woosik Eom, and Young-Tae Jeon. 2021. "Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain Medication, and in-Hospital Mortality among Patients with COVID-19 in South Korea: A Population-Based Cohort Study" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18, no. 13: 6804. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136804

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